Posts Tagged ‘OneFS’

New features in EMC Isilon OneFS 7.2

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

EMC® Isilon® OneFS 7.2 has a number of new and updated features, from node compatibility support and Hadoop updates to the new object storage application based on OpenStack™ Swift. Some of these new capabilities, which offer benefits on both the hardware and software-side, are summarized below. For more technical information about all of the new OneFS 7.2 features and enhancements, refer to the OneFS 7.2 Release Notes, OneFS 7.2 CLI Administration Guide, and OneFS 7.2 Web Administration Guide.

Protection Updates

New protection policy for large capacity nodes
To ensure that node pools made up of large capacity nodes can maintain a data protection level that meets EMC Isilon guidelines for meantime to data loss (MTTDL), OneFS offers a new requested protection option, +3d:1n1d.

Suggested Protection (new clusters only)
If you have a new cluster running OneFS 7.2, congratulations! In addition to your new hardware, you can also take advantage of the OneFS suggested protection feature, which calculates a recommended protection level based on the current configuration of your cluster. It continually evaluates your cluster and alerts you if your cluster falls below the suggested protection level. This feature is available for new clusters only. Clusters that have been upgraded to OneFS 7.2 do not have this capability.

Hadoop enhancements

OneFS 7.2 supports HDFS 2.3 and 2.4, and more Hadoop distributions, including Cloudera CDH5, Hortonworks Data Platform 2.1, and Apache Hadoop 2.4. For more information about how Isilon works with these distributions, see the Hadoop InfoHub or the Cloudera for Isilon InfoHub on the Isilon Community.

Protocols updates

HDFS
In OneFS 7.2, users connecting to the EMC Isilon cluster through a WebHDFS interface can be authenticated with Kerberos. For Cloudera users, HDFS supports secure impersonation through proxy users who impersonate other users with Kerberos credentials to perform Hadoop jobs on HDFS data. See the Cloudera for Isilon InfoHub on the Isilon Community for more information.

NFS
OneFS 7.2 includes many NFS service improvements, such audit and multi-tenant capabilities. Refer to the OneFS 7.2 Release Notes for more details.

Node compatibility

Using the SmartPools® software module, you can specify compatibilities between different generations of nodes that meet certain criteria. For example, you can create compatibilities between Isilon S200 and similarly configured Isilon S210 nodes, and between X400 and similarly configured X410 nodes. This means that if you purchase a new single S210 node, for example, OneFS 7.2 enables you to add this node to an existing node pool of S200 nodes. After you add three or more S210 nodes to your cluster, you can delete the compatibility so that OneFS can autoprovision the new S210 nodes into their own node pools.

In OneFS 7.2, you can create compatibilities between S210 node and S200 nodes, and then add unprovisioned nodes into node pools.

In OneFS 7.2, you can specify compatibilities between an S210 node and S200 node, which will enable the unprovisioned newer generation node to be joined to the existing node pool of older generation nodes.

Isilon Swift

OneFS 7.2 introduces Isilon Swift, an object storage application for Isilon clusters based on the object storage API provided by OpenStack Swift. The Swift RESTful API, an HTTP-based protocol, allows Swift clients to execute Swift API commands directly with the Isilon cluster to execute object storage requests. For more information, see the OneFS 7.2 Isilon Swift Tech Note.

Firmware updates

OneFS 7.2 provides automatic firmware updates through drive support packages. Make sure to install the latest drive support packages to take full advantage of this feature. Log in to the EMC Online Support site to find the latest drive support packages.

How to upgrade to OneFS 7.2

If you want to upgrade to this new release, explore your upgrade options by reviewing the Isilon Supportability and Compatibility GuideThen, prepare for the upgrade process by reviewing the following documents:

When you’re ready to upgrade, download the OneFS 7.2 installation file from the Download section of the EMC Online Support site.

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

[display_rating_result]

The top 3 operational differences between EMC Isilon OneFS 6.5 and OneFS 7.0

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

isilon-onefs-7-0Attention all current EMC® Isilon® OneFS 6.5 users: OneFS 6.5 will reach its end of service life (EOSL) on June 30, 2015. OneFS 7.0 introduces several new features, enhancements, and operational changes. If you need to upgrade to OneFS 7.0, you might be wondering what’s different about this version and how these differences will affect your day-to-day administrative tasks. You can learn more by looking at the Administrative Differences in OneFS 7.0 white paper.

The top three changes that OneFS 6.5 users should prepare for are:

  • Administration using role-based access control (RBAC)
  • Authentication using access zones
  • Managing groups of nodes in SmartPools

Role-based access control

In OneFS 6.5, you can grant web and SSH login and configuration access to non-root users by adding them to the admin group. The admin group is replaced with the administrator role in OneFS 7.0 using RBAC. A role is a collection of OneFS privileges, usually associated with a configuration subsystem, that are granted to members of that role as they log in to the cluster.

For information about role-based access, including a description of roles and privileges, see Isilon OneFS 7.0: Role-Based Access Control.

An important note!

After you upgrade to OneFS 7.0, make sure you add existing administrators to an administrator role.

Access Zones

In OneFS 7.0, all user access to the cluster is controlled through access zones. With access zones, you can partition the cluster configuration into self-contained units and configure a subset of parameters as a virtual cluster with its own set of authentication providers, user mapping rules, and SMB shares. The built-in access zone is the “System” zone, which by default provides the same behavior as OneFS 6.5, using all available authentication providers, NFS exports, and SMB shares.

For information about access zones, see the OneFS 7.0.2 Administration Guide.

SmartPools

In OneFS 6.5, a group of nodes is called a disk pool. In OneFS 7.0, a group of nodes is called a node pool, and a group of disks in a node pool is called a disk pool. Also, Isilon nodes are automatically assigned to node pools in the cluster based on the node type. This is called autoprovisioning. Disk pools can no longer be viewed or targeted directly through the OneFS 7.0 web administration interface or the command-line interface. Instead, the smallest unit of storage that can be administered in OneFS 7.0 is a node pool. Disk pools are managed exclusively by the system through autoprovisioning.

An important note!

Before you upgrade to OneFS 7.0, you must configure disk pools into a supported node pool configuration. Disk pools must contain nodes of the same type, according to their node equivalence class. Disk pools that contain a mixture of node types must be reconfigured.

For information about how to prepare your Isilon cluster for upgrade to OneFS 7.0, see the Isilon OneFS 7.0.1 – 7.0.2 Upgrade Readiness Checklist.

For more information about OneFS 7.0

Visit these links for more information about:

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

[display_rating_result]

Ask EMC Isilon experts about video surveillance

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

Do you have a question about EMC® Isilon® products that you’d like an expert to answer? You have the opportunity to get your questions answered in the Ask the Expert forum on the Isilon Community.

Ask the Expert forums are regularly scheduled events on the EMC Community Network (ECN), which cover many topics and products. For example, previous Isilon Ask the Expert forums covered topics such as scale-out data lakes and SMB protocol support. Next week, you can connect directly with experts about video surveillance solutions (VSS) and Isilon products.

About this month’s ATE topics

Video surveillance technology has been evolving in leaps and bounds. However, this evolution brings challenges, such as complexity and staggering storage demands. For example, if a company uses 100 cameras and decides to retain the footage captured at a high definition resolution (1080p) for 30 days, they might need up to 190 terabytes of storage.

Video also consumes a lot of network bandwidth. Depending on where cameras are located and how they’re used, a company needs to tailor their IT infrastructure to support streaming video feeds and archiving video data. Additionally, companies need to consider how to deploy a VSS within an existing IT infrastructure, and then integrate video management software (VMS) applications into their current operating environments to process the video data. This is a big shift from closed surveillance systems of the past. These days, repurposing IT assets and approaches is commonplace for video surveillance.

EMC Isilon OneFS configured as a tier 2 target for archiving video data.

EMC Isilon OneFS configured as a tier 2 target for archiving video data.

What’s the bottom line about how EMC Isilon helps with video surveillance? “It’s about simplicity at scale,” says Bryan Berezdivin, Chief Solutions Architect for the EMC Emerging Technologies Division of EMC. When more cameras are added, camera technology changes, or camera configurations are changed to provide higher resolutions or higher frame rates, more storage is needed. Isilon enables customers to easily add more storage and handle these frequent changes in the system with no modifications on the VMS applications.

Last week, EMC announced Isilon as a core solution for video surveillance. You can use the ATE forum to ask questions about deploying Isilon as a core solution, migrating your data, or configuring your Isilon cluster to support specific VSS workflows and architectures.

How to submit your questions to the forum

RSVP today for next week’s Ask the Expert discussions to get email updates about the event.  Questions will be answered between October 13 -27, 2014 by Frank McCarthy (Director of Video Surveillance Solutions within the Global Corporate Practice at EMC), Bryan Berezdivin, Ken Mills (Senior Manager, Business Development for Isilon products), and Joe Catalanotti (Product Marketing Manager with EMC). You can submit your questions to the Ask the Expert forum on the Isilon Online Community.

These experts have extensive experience in the video surveillance industry and with Isilon products. They can answer questions about Isilon topics such as configuration, data protection, disaster recovery, and VSS architectures. Or you can ask about the latest video technology and trends. Learn more about these experts on the Isilon Community site.

If you’re interested in more ATE forums, keep visiting the Isilon Community or ECN event page for upcoming events.

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

[display_rating_result]

Behind the scenes: Making the Access Zones technical demo video

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein
Amol Choukekar

Amol Choukekar

The Offer & Enablement (O&E) team within the EMC® Isilon® Professional Services department is a well-oiled machine when it comes to making videos. In the past year, they’ve played a key role in conceptualizing and collaborating to develop almost a third of the videos published to the Isilon Support YouTube playlist—from whiteboard videos to technical demos—that demonstrate how features of the OneFS® operating system work.

Principal Solutions Architect Amol Choukekar describes the story behind the origin and production of their latest video, Technical Demo: Access Zones in OneFS 7.1.1. In this interview, you’ll learn how frequently asked questions from customers about Access Zone configuration and directory layouts inspired the O&E team to create this video.

Q: Tell us about your team and why you produce these videos?

A: Our team is comprised of solutions architects and technical program managers who all contribute to making these videos. There is a lot of effort that goes into these projects. Specifically, creating and revising the script and setting up the demo environments that we use to create these videos.

Our main objective in producing these videos is to demonstrate OneFS features in a simple-to-follow format. The value for our customers and partners is to use the knowledge gained in the video and then apply that to their EMC Isilon solution.

Q: Why was Access Zones selected as a topic for a technical demo?

A: Access Zones was initially introduced in the OneFS 7.0 release. The OneFS 7.1.1 release includes interesting changes to the Access Zones feature, such as the concept of a zone-base directory. Other feature changes include zone-specific SMB shares, which eliminate the duplicate share name issue that existed in previous versions of OneFS (login is required to view Isilon OneFS 7.1.1 Release Notes). Also, our HDFS support is now zone-aware, which is becoming very popular. These changes represent another step in the evolution of our scale out multi-tenancy story in OneFS. The purpose of the video is to make our customers aware of these important changes.

Q: What were some frequently asked questions about Access Zones that helped you develop the script?

A: One of the criteria in configuring Access Zones is the zone-base directory, because a main criteria in configuring a OneFS cluster is to correctly lay out the directory structure. Our field teams were frequently asked questions about directory layout. For example, when we configure Access Zones or our cluster, where should we base our zone directory considering the various workflows and data segregation needs? This is an important design decision when deploying a scale-out network attached storage (NAS) solution such as EMC Isilon.

One of the objectives of the video was to demonstrate the proper use of the OneFS directory path convention. For example, with /ifs as the cluster root path, the best practices we’ve seen in the field for creating the directory layout is to use a /ifs/clustername/zonename/ structure. That can become your Access Zone rule, and then you can create SMB shares under that directory.

Zone-based directories in OneFS 7.1.1

Zone-base directories in OneFS 7.1.1

Q: What were some of the other goals when making this video?

A: The other goals for the video were to demonstrate the new Access Zone feature in a simplistic way without using any technical jargon. We really wanted the audience to easily grasp the concepts because these are the building blocks for the OneFS solution.And we wanted to demonstrate the feature in a workflow format to help the viewer understand the concepts related to Access Zones.

Q: What were some of the challenges when making this video?

A: While the content of the video is introductory, there was a lot of effort put in by our technical program managers to create the environment and make sure that the technical steps were complete and easily reproducible. Although it was a bit time consuming, it was not difficult at all because OneFS is one of the easiest NAS operating systems that I have ever worked with.

Q: What else would you like to add?

A: We hope all of our viewers find this useful. If you do find it useful, we highly encourage you to share it with your peers, customers, or anybody that uses OneFS and needs to configure Access Zones. And provide us with feedback on this video or existing videos, or suggestions for new topics.

[Editor’s note: please provide your feedback and suggestions by sending an email to isicontent@emc.com]

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

[display_rating_result]

Find information about EMC Isilon OneFS patches in one document

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

EMC® Isilon® patch documentation has been updated, making it easier to find information about patches for the OneFS operating system. Previously, you had to check several separate documents for each supported version of OneFS to determine if a patch was available for a specific known issue. Now you can refer to a single document, Current Patches for EMC Isilon OneFS, (log in to the EMC Online Support site is required) to find information about any patch for any version of OneFS.

The best way to resolve known issues in OneFS is to upgrade to a recent OneFS maintenance release (MR). However, if you need a solution before an MR is released and a patch is available, you can download and install a patch. Often, Isilon will issue a standard patch for a specific issue or a rollup patch to fix issues within a component of OneFS. (Not every known issue is addressed with a patch.)
This consolidated document provides the benefit of reviewing all available patches of versions of OneFS. This can help you consider which version of OneFS that you want to upgrade to next.

All OneFS patches and current patch documentation are on the EMC Online Support site. For example, if EMC Isilon Technical Support provides your with a patch ID number, you can search for it in EMC Online Support by entering “patch-[ID number],” as shown in the image below. Or you can check the new reference, Current patches for OneFS. This document provides a current list of patches available for supported versions of OneFS.

Searching for patch ID numbers in the EMC Online Support site.

Searching for patch ID numbers in the EMC Online Support site.

How to download and install patches

For details about finding, downloading, and installing a patch. Watch the video “Understanding Patches for EMC Isilon OneFS” for an overview of patches and to learn the complete process for applying a patch to OneFS.

You can also read the knowledge base article “Understanding patches for EMC Isilon products (176358)” for a detailed description of the topics covered in the video.

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, send an email to isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, send an email to isicontent@emc.com.

[display_rating_result]

Find Isilon help content on the EMC Isilon online community

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

You now have a fast and easy option for downloading EMC® Isilon® help content: visit the EMC Isilon online community.

Recently, the Isilon Community was enhanced in an effort to bring together Isilon-related content—including discussions and documentation—into one place and make it searchable on popular search engines. Here is a list of OneFS and Isilon documentation you can access immediately (you many have to log in to your EMC Community Network [ECN] account to access some of the documents).

Document Title

Overview

OneFS Version

OneFS Web Administration Guide A comprehensive guide to administering your cluster from the web administration interface.

 

OneFS CLI Administration Guide* A comprehensive guide to administering your cluster from the command-line interface. OneFS 7.1
Isilon Site Preparation and Planning* Learn about node specifications, switches and cables, networking topology, and other site installation topics. All versions
EMC Isilon Upgrade Planning and Preparation Includes steps for planning, completing, and troubleshooting a OneFS upgrade.
Backup and Recovery Guide Learn about methods for backing up your cluster, such as SyncIQ and NDMP. OneFS 7.1
Current Isilon Software Releases Learn which releases are available for Isilon OneFS, OneFS software modules, and Isilon firmware packages. All versions

* Requires an EMC Community Network (ECN) account

 

Search for technical white papers

The EMC Isilon Community also features technical white papers. White papers typically describe a solution to a specific problem or scenario. For example, you can download technical white papers on topics such as Hadoop implementation, data migration, electronic design automation, and multiprotocol security. To search for these white papers and additional Isilon documentation, go to the Content tab of the Isilon Community, click on the Document icon, and filter by the “documentation” tag.

How to find more help content

The EMC Isilon Community is a good source for Isilon-related content. However, additional Isilon help documentation is available only on the EMC Online Support site, including:

  • Knowledgebase articles
  • EMC Technical Advisories
  • Software downloads (except the OneFS 7.1.0.1 simulator, which is available for download on the EMC Isilon Community)
  • Help documentation for all OneFS versions

To begin your search, first log in to the EMC Online Support site, go to the OneFS product page, and enter your search terms. Watch the video, How to find content on the EMC Online Support site, for more information.

Start a conversation

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, send an email to isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, send an email to isicontent@emc.com.

[display_rating_result]

Top 20 EMC Isilon support documents in May 2014

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

One of the goals of this blog is to share the most useful EMC® Isilon® support-related content that we have to offer. In this post, we’re highlighting 20 of the most viewed knowledgebase (KB) articles and product documents from the month of May.

We hope these documents will help you to quickly find an answer to a common question or resolve an issue.

Top 10 KB articles

To access these KB articles, log in to the EMC Online Support site. Articles in bold are new to the top 10 list this month.

  1. OneFS 7.1 SMB and Authentication Rollup Patch (174372)
  2. OneFS 7.0.2 SMB and Authentication Rollup Patch (172623)
  3. Best practices for NFS client settings (90041)
  4. How to reset a node to factory defaults (16696)
  5. How to upgrade firmware on Intel (QLogic) 12300 and 12800 InfiniBand switches (170524)
  6. Troubleshooting performance issues (88844)
  7. How to create a bootable image of OneFS on a USB flash drive (16691)
  8. OneFS 7.0.0 – 7.0.1.2: The SmartConnect zone is not available, or all clients connect to one node in the SmartConnect zone in OneFS 7.0.x (91535)
  9. OneFS sysctl commands (89334)
  10. How to reimage a node using a USB flash drive (16582)

 

Top 10 product documents

To access these PDF documents, log in to the EMC Online Support site. Documents in bold are new to the top 10 list this month.

  1. Current Isilon Software Releases
  2. OneFS 7.1 CLI Administration Guide
  3. Isilon Supportability and Compatibility Guide
  4. OneFS 7.1.0 MR Release Notes
  5. OneFS 7.1 Web Administration Guide
  6. OneFS 7.0.2 Administration Guide
  7. OneFS 7.0.1 Administration Guide
  8. Current Patches for Isilon OneFS 7.1
  9. Current Patches for Isilon OneFS 7.0
  10. OneFS 7.0.2 Command Reference

 

Start a conversation

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, send an email to isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, send an email to isicontent@emc.com.

[display_rating_result]

Understanding Global Namespace Acceleration (GNA)

Colin Torretta

Colin Torretta

Senior Technical Writer
Colin Torretta

Latest posts by Colin Torretta (see all)

With the proliferation of solid state drives (SSDs) in data centers across the world, companies are finding more and more ways to take advantage of the high speed and low latency of SSDs in unique and exciting ways. Within the EMC® Isilon® OneFS® operating system, one of the innovative ways Isilon is using SSDs is for Global Namespace Acceleration (GNA). GNA is a feature of OneFS that increases performance across your entire cluster by using SSDs to store file metadata for read-only purposes, even in node pools that don’t contain dedicated SSDs.

GNA is managed through the SmartPools™ software module of the OneFS web administration interface. SmartPools enables storage tiering and the ability to aggregate different type of drives (such as SSDs and HDDs) into node pools. When GNA is enabled, all SSDs in the cluster are used to accelerate metadata reads across the entire cluster. Isilon recommends one SSD per node as a best practice, with two SSDs per node being preferred. However, customers with a mix of drive types can benefit from the metadata read acceleration with GNA regardless of how SSDs are placed across the cluster. When possible, GNA stores metadata in the same node pool containing the associated data. If there are no dedicated SSDs in the node pool, however, a random selection is made to any node pool containing SSDs. This means as long as SSDs are available somewhere in the cluster, a node pool can benefit from GNA.

For more information about GNA, see the “Storage Pools” section of the OneFS web administration and CLI administration guides.

Important considerations when using GNA

Here are some important considerations to keep in mind when determining whether GNA can benefit your workflow.

  • Use GNA for cold data workflows. Certain workflows benefit more from the performance gains that GNA provides. For example, workflows that require heavy indexing of “cold data”—which is archive data on stored on disks that is left unmodified for extended periods of time—benefit the most from the increased speed of metadata read acceleration. GNA does not provide any additional benefit to customers who already have solely SSD clusters, because all metadata is already stored on SSDs.
  • SSDs must account for a minimum of 1.5% of the total space on your cluster. To use GNA, 20% of the nodes in your cluster must contain SSDs, and SSDs must account for a minimum of 1.5% of the total space on your cluster, with 2% being strongly recommended. This ensures that GNA does not overwhelm the SSDs on your cluster. Failure to maintain these requirements will result in GNA being disabled and metadata read acceleration being lost. To enable GNA again, metadata copies will have to be rebuilt, which can take time.
  • Consider how new nodes affect the total cluster space. Adding new nodes to your cluster affects the percentage of nodes with SSDs and total available space on SSDs. Keep this in mind whenever you add new nodes to avoid GNA being disabled and the metadata copy being immediately deleted. SSDs must account for a minimum of 1.5% of total space on your cluster.
  • Do not remove the extra metadata mirror. When GNA is enabled, an SSD is set aside as an additional metadata mirror, in addition to the existing mirrors set by your requested protection, which is determined in SmartPools settings. A common misunderstanding is that the SSD is an “extra” mirror and it can be safely removed without affecting your cluster. In reality, this extra metadata mirror is critical to the functionality of GNA, and removing it causes OneFS to rebuild the mirror on another drive. See the graphic below for information on the number of metadata mirrors per requested protection when using GNA. For more information about requested protection, see the “Storage Pools” section of the OneFS Web Administration Guide.
The number of metadata mirrors required by GNA per requested protection level in OneFS.

The number of metadata copies required by GNA to achieve read acceleration per requested protection level in OneFS.

 

[display_rating_result]

The new face of the EMC Isilon Community

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

The official EMC® Isilon® online community has been updated! If you haven’t seen it yet, visit the new EMC Isilon Community on the EMC Community Network (ECN) now.

The ECN has always been a good resource for those interested in EMC to connect and start conversations. Through an effort to bring together everything Isilon-related in one place, the EMC Isilon Community now provides:

  • A free version of the Isilon OneFS 7.1.0.1 Simulator
  • Key support, training, and marketing content all consistently tagged for easy searching
  • Access to Isilon experts via forum discussions

Easily search for content

We’ve pooled together our greatest technical content—including product documentation, blogs, white papers, marketing materials, training, and videos—and placed it into one space to make it easier to search. We want to help Isilon customers and employees quickly find content and discussions that they need.

The Content tab on the EMC Isilon Community enables you to filter results by content type and tags.

The Content tab on the EMC Isilon Community enables you to filter results by content type and tags.

 

All the content available on the EMC Isilon Community is also searchable by popular search engines. You can also start your search by visiting the EMC Isilon Community home page, where information is organized by task:

  • Learn: Access materials to help you get started with Isilon OneFS, such as the OneFS Simulator, technical videos, and “Ask the Expert” discussion threads
  • Configure: Download how-to guides and information about the latest software and firmware releases
  • Manage: Find content and discussions related to best practices for monitoring and managing OneFS
  • Support: Connect with EMC Isilon Technical Support resources and browse popular content about troubleshooting and support-related questions

Click the Content tab to access advanced search filters and browse categories of content. When you create an ECN account and log in, you can follow, share, and participate in the EMC Isilon Community. Log in or register as a new user.

Start a discussion

Click the "Start a Discussion" link to begin a conversation with Isilon community members.

Click the “Start a Discussion” link to begin a conversation with Isilon community members.

If you have a question for the Isilon community or want to share an interesting tip with fellow OneFS users, start a discussion in our community space. Click the “Start a discussion link. You will need an ECN account to create a new discussion topic. You can also include tags and categories to help others find your discussion through their searches.

Isilon employees often join the conversation and can provide answers to your questions. We’re here to listen to your feedback and help.

Look for regular updates

We’ll continue to curate new content and keep this community updated with the latest information, training, and topics that matter to you. Add a bookmark to the EMC Isilon Community site and check back regularly to stay on top of the latest Isilon knowledge.

We’ll also add links to the EMC Store, where you can explore and buy Isilon products.

Give us your feedback

We’ll continue to grow and update the EMC Isilon Community over time. Your suggestions, ideas, and comments are valuable to us. Let us know what you think by sending us your feedback by email to isicontent@emc.com, or by starting a discussion on the EMC Isilon Community.

[display_rating_result]

Creating SMB shares with expansion variables in EMC Isilon OneFS

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

To make it easy for users in your organization to connect to a home directory through a Windows client, you can create an SMB share in EMC® Isilon® OneFS®. The share specifies configurable permissions, performance, and security settings for each individual user. Managing SMB shares in OneFS 6.5 through 7.1 can be done manually for each user, or dynamically for a large number of users. To create an SMB share or home directory, you can take advantage of these approaches:

  • Create unique SMB shares for user home directories
    • Dynamically create a unique share for each user home directory
    • Manually create a unique share for each user home directory
  • Create a common SMB share for user home directories
    • Dynamically create user home directories in a common share
    • Manually create user home directories in a common share

Each one of these approaches is highlighted in the new white paper, “Managing SMB shares and user home directories in OneFS 6.5 and later.”

How to dynamically create an SMB share using expansion variables

One of the approaches, as described in “Managing SMB shares and user home directories in OneFS 6.5 and later,” is to dynamically create SMB shares and home directories for new users. Instead of creating per-user SMB shares, you can create a single share that includes expansion variables, such as %U for the user name. For example, when a new user logs in through Active Directory, OneFS automatically creates a unique SMB share and directory for that user.

To dynamically create unique SMB shares using name expansion variables, follow these steps:

In OneFS 7.0 and OneFS 7.1

To take full advantage of expansion variables in SMB shares, you should be running OneFS 7.0.2.9 and later, or OneFS 7.1.0.2 and later.

  1. Log in to the OneFS web administration interface.
  2. Click Protocols > Windows Sharing (SMB) > SMB Shares > Add a Share.
  3. Type a share name (for example, Home) and optional description (for example, User Home Directories).
  4. In the Directory to Be Shared box, type /ifs/home/%U. If you store home directories in another location, specify that location instead.
  5. Click Apply Windows Default ACLs.
  6. Select the Allow Variable Expansion check box.
  7. Select the Auto-Create Directories check box.
  8. Click Create.

Dynamically create SMB share and home directories using expansion variables.

In OneFS 6.5

  1. Log in to the OneFS web administration interface.
  2. Click File Sharing > SMB > Add Share.
  3. Type a share name (for example, Home) and description (for example, User Home Directories).
  4. In the Directory to share box, type /ifs/home/%U. If you store home directories in another location, specify that location instead.
  5. Click Apply Windows default ACLs.
  6. Select the Allow Username Expansion check box.
  7. Selectthe Automatically Create User Directory check box.
  8. Click Submit.

More information about SMB and home directories in OneFS

For more information about expansion variables, see the “Create an SMB share” and “Home directory creation in a mixed environment” sections in the OneFS web administration guides. The administration guide also provides configuration information for accessing home directories through FTP or SSH.

[display_rating_result]