Posts Tagged ‘documentation’

EMC Isilon OneFS 7.2.1 is available!

Risa Galant

Risa Galant

Principal Technical Writer at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Risa Galant

Latest posts by Risa Galant (see all)

EMC Isilon OneFS 7.2.1 release has some great new and updated features that provide benefits on both the hardware and software side, including:

  • Security Technical Implementation Guide (STIG) configuration support
  • FIPS OpenSSL support
  • CAC/PIV authentication
  • Enhanced IPv6 support
  • Enhanced Swift support
  • Global namespace acceleration and L3 cache interaction
  • New node and SSD class compatibility support

In addition, the upgrade requirements for OneFS 7.2.1 differ from previous releases. This post highlights some of the new capabilities and upgrade requirements.

For more technical information about all of the new OneFS 7.2.1 features and enhancements, refer to the following documents:

New features

The following new features are included in OneFS 7.2.1.

Hardened profiles: Security Technical Implementation Guide (STIG)

If your site requires compliance with the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) STIG configuration standards, you’re in luck! OneFS 7.2.1 introduces a license-based security hardening feature through which you can apply and revert a hardening policy on the EMC Isilon cluster to meet DISA STIG configuration standards.

Networking:  enhanced IPv6 support

You can configure your cluster to accept client connections through both IPv4 and IPv6. OneFS adds dual-stack support to enable your cluster to support IPv4 and IPv6 client connections concurrently. And, OneFS 7.2.1 also supports IPv6-only environments.

Note that HDFS, InsightIQ 3.1 and earlier, MMC, NIS, and Swift are not supported over IPv6.

OneFS API: enhanced Swift support

Isilon Swift is now supported with the HTTP and secure HTTP (HTTPS) protocols over IPv4.

Isilon Swift supports the HTTP protocol with IPv6, but does not support HTTPS with IPv6. Isilon Swift also supports the HTTP protocol with IPv4 if STIG hardening is disabled.

File system: Global namespace acceleration (GNA) and L3 cache interaction

OneFS 7.2.1 includes some changes to how storage space calculations work when GNA and L3 cache are both enabled in the same cluster.

In OneFS, you can use solid-state drives (SSDs) for strategies such as GNA mirroring or for L3 cache. GNA mirroring enables data on node pools that do not have SSDs to have additional metadata mirrors on SSDs elsewhere in the cluster. The additional SSD metadata mirroring can improve file system performance by accelerating metadata read operations.

In OneFS 7.2.1, GNA requires that at least 20 percent of the nodes in the cluster contain at least one SSD, and that at least 1.5 percent of the total cluster storage is SSD-based. Any SSDs that are used for L3 cache are not counted against the GNA requirements: with GNA enabled and with L3 cache configured for a pool, the nodes in the pool with L3 cache configured become invisible to the GNA calculations. This change helps to ensure equitable and fair calculations when L3 cache and GNA are enabled in the same cluster.  For more information, see the OneFS 7.2.1 Release Notes and the OneFS 7.2.1 CLI Administration Guide.

Hardware: Node class compatibility

You can deploy a newer-generation node to a cluster that contains nodes from an earlier generation of the same class. For example, if your cluster already has a node pool that consists of Isilon X200 nodes, you can define a compatibility that enables you to add an X210 node to the same node pool. OneFS 7.2.1 supports compatibilities for S200/S210, X200/X210, X400/X410, and NL400/NL410 nodes. Compatible node generations must have identical HDD and SSD layouts and must have a compatible memory configuration. See the OneFS 7.2.1 Release Notes for details.

SSD compatibility

SSD compatibility enables you to add nodes with different capacity SSDs to the same node pool. For example, if your cluster has a node pool that consists of Isilon S200 nodes with 100 GB SSDs and you purchase new S200 nodes with 200 GB SSDs, you can create an SSD compatibility so that the new S200 nodes can be provisioned into the existing S200 node pool. For nodes of different generations—for example, S200 and S210 nodes – you might have to create a node class compatibility and an SSD compatibility to enable the S210 nodes to be provisioned into an S200 node pool.

Support for new platforms

OneFS 7.2.1 provides support for two new platforms: the X210 and the NL410. These nodes support node class compatibility. X210 nodes can be added to existing X200 node pools, and NL410 nodes can be added to existing NL400 node pools.

How to upgrade to OneFS 7.2.1

You can upgrade directly to OneFS 7.2.1 only from OneFS 7.1.1.4 or later, or from OneFS 7.2.0.2 or later. For more information, see Upgrade Paths to OneFS 7.2.1.0.

If you want to upgrade to this new release, explore your upgrade options by reviewing the Isilon Supportability and Compatibility GuideThen, prepare for the upgrade process by reviewing the following documents:

When you’re ready to upgrade, download the OneFS 7.2.1.0 installation file from the Download section of the EMC Online Support site.

Isilon Ask the Expert Forum happening now

Risa Galant

Risa Galant

Principal Technical Writer at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Risa Galant

Latest posts by Risa Galant (see all)

The Ask the Expert forum on the EMC Isilon Community featuring the Isilon Information Experience team is happening now until August 7.

This is a great opportunity to ask questions, exchange ideas, and share opinions about Isilon technical content with the people who create it, including  product documentation, release notes, videos, white papers, and more.  Check it out here. See you there!

All about improving EMC Isilon OneFS release notes

Deb Kuykendall

Deb Kuykendall

Principal Technical Writer at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Deb Kuykendall

Latest posts by Deb Kuykendall (see all)

Back in February, I wrote about EMC Isilon OneFS release notes and hinted that we’d be making changes to the format to improve their usability. I’m happy to announce that these changes are now in place and that you can see them in the OneFS 7.1.1 release notes.

What’s Changed

We’ve merged all of the release notes pertaining to a release branch (for example, 7.1.1) into a single document. This means that the 7.1.1 release notes contain all of the information about this OneFS branch from OneFS 7.1.1.0 (released in August 2014) through 7.1.1.5 (released in June 2015).

The new document includes:

  • All the new features that were introduced in OneFS 7.1.1.0 through OneFS 7.1.1.5
  • All the issues that have been addressed in in OneFS 7.1.1.0 through OneFS 7.1.1.5
  • All the functionality changes that were introduced in in OneFS 7.1.1.0 through OneFS 7.1.1.5

What’s New

To improve the document’s usability, we defined a list of functional areas. And, to help ensure that the functional areas are well understood, we included the full list of functional areas and their definitions at the end of the release notes. For example, the functional area of SMB encompasses new features, changes, and issues that affect SMB environments.

The content in the release notes is organized first by release number (for example, OneFS  7.1.1.2)  and then by functional area. This means that if you want to know if there are any new features, resolved issues, or changes in functionality that affect a particular area, such as SMB, in a specific OneFS release, such as 7.1.1.5, you can use the bookmarks pane or the table of contents to easily find that information.

Here’s an example of what you’ll find in the new table of contents (TOC):

OneFS 7.1.1-7.1.1.5 release notes

And here’s an example of what you’ll find in the Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader bookmarks pane:

OneFS 7.1.1-7.1.1.5 Bookmarks

We’ve also added an introductory section for each chapter, describing what you can expect to find there.

The new document also highlights the Target Code release. This change helps you understand how the Target Code release relates to other releases in the branch.

What did we gain?

Before making these changes, if you wanted the full picture of a OneFS release or maintenance release, you’d have to download two or three documents and piece them together. Each document contained some unique information, such as new features, and some overlapping information, such as known issues. The differences weren’t always obvious.

Now all of the information is in a single document that clearly identifies the release in which a fix, a change, or a feature was introduced.

In addition, the release notes previously contained multiple, lengthy tables that were sorted by a cryptic ID number. If you wanted to find issues related to a specific area of operation, you’d have to do a keyword search and collect bits and pieces of information scattered throughout the document.

Now the information is categorized first by the release in which the feature, fix, or change was introduced, and then categorized into tables according to the functional area that the feature, fix, or change affects. The new tables are small and easily scanned, and the information they contain is tightly focused.

How we did it

Developing the new release note format was a team effort involving writers, an information architect, and members of our user experience team.

We conducted user testing and issued a survey about the new format to confirm that the changes we planned to implement were in fact improvements that would benefit our readers. The feedback we received from user testing influenced the development of the document.

For example, one of our concerns early on was that the document was too long. However, user testing indicated that our users don’t read the document from beginning to end. Their chief concern is finding specific pieces of information easily, and they tend to jump from one place to another using keywords, the table of contents, or the bookmarks pane. So document length is not an issue.

Also, we had initially planned to separate new features from changes in functionality. User testing showed that our readers expected to find all of the new and changed features and functionality in the same chapter.

The most striking piece of feedback? Categorizing the information by functional area scored as a significant improvement for all of our testers.

Here are some of the usability testers’ comments:

  • “This is so great! Seriously. This is so much more legible and issues are so much easier to find.
  • “For me the redesign is a massive improvement over the current format. I hope this new format can be the new standard.”
  • “Known issues clearly separated by topic is a huge gain in usability. A consolidated listing of known and resolved issues for the major + each MR in one location is a time saver. If I have to attempt several keyword searches to find what I need, it takes me only 50 percent the time to do this in a combined doc.”

What’s next

As of today, the new release note format has been implemented in the OneFS 7.1.1.0 – OneFS 7.1.1.5 release notes. By the end of July, the new format will be implemented in release notes for the OneFS 7.2.0 branch as new versions of OneFS are released, the new release note format will be used to document those releases.

A new project to evaluate whether the new format can be applied to the release notes for other EMC products will be underway soon.

We’d like to hear from you about the changes and how they affect your ability to use the OneFS 7.1.1 release notes.  You can provide feedback by taking the short survey located here:

http://bit.ly/isi-docfeedback

Or send an email to docfeedback@isilon.com.

These links are also available in the OneFS Release Resources section of the OneFS 7.1.1 Release Notes.

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Ask the Expert forum about EMC Isilon technical content on July 27

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

Do you have an opinion about the technical content that EMC Isilon publishes? The EMC Isilon Information Experience team—who generates documentation, release notes, videos, white papers, and more—wants to hear from you.

Let us know how we’re doing. RSVP for our Ask the Expert event on Isilon Product Community, starting July 27, 2015 and continuing through August 7. During this event, you can submit your questions, opinions, and ideas to a forum discussion thread. Answers will be submitted by the Isilon Information Experience team.

What is the “Ask the Expert” forum?

Ask the Expert (ATE) events are regularly scheduled forums that cover many topics and products. Previous ATE events include Scale-out Data Lakes and SMB Protocol Support.  In this special session, content professionals, including our Director of Information Experience, our blogger and social media lead, and several content developers will answer questions we receive from you.

You can ask us about anything related to our technical content, such as:

  • How can I be notified about the latest Isilon content?
  • How do you decide what content to publish?
  • How do I share my idea for a great paper/blog/article with you?
  • What is an Info Hub and why should I care?

What’s in it for you?

The EMC Isilon Information Experience team will post a summary of our ATE session findings. It will contain a roadmap for when you might expect to see the changes you request, if we can accommodate them, and an honest answer if we cannot.

For years, the global economy has been in transit from goods, to information, to knowledge. In particular, the need for trust grows as customers interact with content more often through more digital platforms and channels. Knowledge is now currency AND product. We recognize that our first contact with you may be through content, and we need to build trust through content.

The best way we can build trust with you is to exchange ideas, and the EMC Isilon Ask the Expert event on technical content is a great way to start the conversation. We hope to talk to you soon!

Visit the RSVP page for more details about this event. If you’re interested in more ATE forums, visit the Isilon Community or ECN event page for upcoming events.

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Cluster capacity advice from an EMC Isilon expert

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

Avoiding scenarios where your cluster reaches maximum capacity is crucial for making sure it runs properly. Our Best Practices for Maintaining Enough Free Space on Isilon Clusters and Pools guide contains information to help Isilon customers keep their clusters running smoothly.

However, there are common misperceptions about cluster capacity, such as the notion that it’s easy to delete data from a cluster that is 100 percent full. Another misunderstanding: using Virtual Hot Spare (VHS) to reserve space for smartfailing a drive is not always necessary.

To clarify these issues and other concerns about cluster capacity, I interviewed one of Isilon’s top experts on this topic, Bernie Case. Bernie is a Technical Support Engineer V in Global Services at Isilon, with many years of experience working with customers who experience maximum cluster capacity scenarios. He is also a contributing author to the Best Practices for Maintaining Enough Free Space on Isilon Clusters and Pools guide. In this blog post, Bernie answers questions about cluster capacity and provides advice and solutions.

Q: What are common scenarios in the field that lead to a cluster reaching capacity?

A: The typical scenarios are when there’s an increased data ingest, which can come from either a normal or an unexpected workflow. If you’re adding a new node or replacing nodes to add capacity, and it takes longer than expected, a normal workflow will continue to write data into the cluster—possibly causing the cluster to reach capacity. Or there is a drive or node failure on an already fairly full cluster, which necessitates a FlexProtect (or FlexProtectLin) job from the Job Engine to run to re-protect data, therefore interrupting normal SnapshotDelete jobs. [See EMC Isilon Job Engine to learn more about these jobs.] Finally, I’ve seen snapshot policies that create a volume of snapshots that takes a long time to delete even after snapshot expiration. [See Best Practices for Working with Snapshots for snapshot schedule tips.]

Q: What are common misperceptions about cluster capacity?

A: Some common misconceptions include:

  • 95 percent of a 1 PiB cluster still leaves about 50TiB of space. That’s plenty for our workflow. We won’t fill that up.
  • Filling up one tier and relying on spillover to another tier won’t affect performance.
  • The SnapshotDelete job should be able to keep up with our snapshot creation rate.
  • Virtual Hot Spare (VHS) is not necessary in our workflow; we need that space for our workflow.
  • It’s still very easy to delete data when the cluster is 100 percent full.

Q: What are the ramifications of a full cluster?

A: When a cluster reaches full capacity, you’re dealing primarily with data unavailable situations—where data might be able to be read, but not written. For example, a customer can experience the inability to run SyncIQ policies, because those policies write data into the root file system (/ifs). There’s also the inability to make cluster configuration changes because those configurations are stored within /ifs.

Finally, a remove (rm) command for deleting files may not function when a cluster is completely full, requiring support intervention.

Q: What should a customer do immediately if their cluster is approaching 90-95 percent capacity?

A: Do whatever you can to slow down the ingesting or retention of data, including moving data to other storage tiers or other clusters, or adjusting snapshot policies. To gain a little bit of temporary space, make sure that VHS is not disabled.

Call your EMC account team to prepare for more storage capacity. You should do this at around 80-85 percent capacity.  It does take time to get those nodes on-site, and you don’t want any downtime.

VHS in SmartPools settings should always be enabled. The default drive to protect is 1 drive, and reserved space should be set to zero. For more information, see KB 88964.

VHS options should always be selected to set aside space for a drive failure. You should have at least 1 virtual drive (default value) set to 0% of total storage. For more information on these default values, see KB 88964 on the EMC Online Support site.

Q: What are the most effective short-term solutions for managing or monitoring cluster capacity?

A: Quotas are an effective way to see real-time storage usage within a directory, particularly if you put directories in specific storage tiers or node pools. Leverage quotas wherever you can.

The TreeDelete job [in the Job Engine] can quickly delete data, but make sure that the data you’re deleting isn’t just going into a snapshot!

Q: What are the most effective long-term solutions to implement from the best practices guide?

A: Make sure you have an event notifications properly configured, so that when jobs fail, or drives fail, you’ll know it and can take immediate action. In addition to notifications and alerts, you can use Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) to monitor cluster space, for an additional layer of protection.

InsightIQ and the FSAnalyze job [which the system runs to create data for InsightIQ’s file system analytics tools] can give great views into storage usage and change rate, over time, particularly in terms of daily, monthly, or weekly data ingest.

Q: Is there anything you would like to add?

A: Cluster-full situations where the rm command doesn’t work are sometimes alarming. In a file system such as OneFS, a file deletion often requires a read-modify-write cycle for metadata structures, in addition to the usual unlinking and garbage collection that occurs within the file system. Getting out of that situation can be challenging and sometimes time-consuming. Resolving it requires a support call—and a remote session, which can be a big problem for private clusters.

Sometimes accidents happen or a node can fail, which can push a cluster to the limit of capacity thresholds. Incidents such as these can occasionally lead to data unavailability situations that can halt a customer’s workflow. Being ready to add capacity at 80-85 percent can prevent just this sort of situation.

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, or comments about the video specifically, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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Is your site ready for an EMC Isilon cluster?

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

If you’re in the market for a new data storage solution, such as an EMC® Isilon® scale-out network attached storage (NAS) system, you’ve probably done a good amount of research to determine which solution will best meet your needs.

One important area of research is determining if your data center is ready for an EMC Isilon cluster. The Isilon Site Preparation and Planning Guide (login with an EMC Community Network account required) can help answer important questions about how to prepare a data center infrastructure for new Isilon equipment. Designed for system administrators or facility managers, this guide offers specific information about environmental and power requirements for data centers.

The information in this guide extends beyond providing site requirements. It’s also a useful reference for selecting equipment and preparing for the arrival and set up of your new cluster.

Selecting the right equipment

EMC Isilon NodesThe Isilon Site Preparation and Planning Guide is a singular resource for specifications and recommendations about all the equipment that makes up an Isilon cluster.

For example, this guide includes specifications for the following:

  • Nodes: Get specs on storage capacity, dimensions, and more for all supported nodes including S210, S200, X200, X410, X400, NL400, and A100 accelerator nodes.
  • Rack cabinets: Learn about standard storage racks requirements and delivery dimensions.
  • Cables: Get recommendations for managing InfiniBand and Cat 5 cables. For demonstrations of proper cable management, watch the EMC Isilon Site Preparation and Planning: Cabling video.

Installing your cluster

For an overview of cluster installation basics, such as topology, node positioning, and planning for expansion or service needs, watch the EMC Isilon Site Preparation and Planning: Cluster Installation video.

To help you with the installation process, Isilon Professional Services can assist you with setting up your new Isilon cluster to meet the needs of your specific workflows. The Isilon Site Preparation and Planning Guide provides a list of what to consider when first installing your cluster, which you can review with your Professional Services account representative:

  • Which version of the Isilon OneFS® operating system to install on the cluster
  • Network connectivity details, including IP ranges, for your cluster nodes, client, and InfiniBand networks
  • DNS configuration details, including name servers and search lists
  • Directory services such as Active Directory, LDAP, NIS, or local user groups
  • File sharing protocols such as SMB and NFS, and advanced file sharing options
  • Data protection levels, anti-virus solutions, NDMP backup, and auditing
  • Cluster alert solutions such as ESRS and SNMP monitoring

For more complete information on these topics, read the Isilon Site Preparation and Planning Guide.

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, send an email to isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, send an email to isicontent@emc.com.

 

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Top 20 EMC Isilon support documents in June 2014

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

One of the goals of this blog is to share the most useful EMC® Isilon® support-related content that we have to offer. In this post, we’re highlighting 20 of the most viewed knowledgebase (KB) articles and product documents from the month of June.

We hope these documents will help you to quickly find an answer to a common question or resolve an issue.

Top 10 KB articles

To access these KB articles, log in to the EMC Online Support site. Articles in bold are new to the top 10 list.

  1. OneFS 7.1.0.3 SMB and Authentication Rollup Patch (174372)
  2. OneFS 7.0.2.9: SMB and Authentication Rollup Patch (172623)
  3. Best practices for NFS client settings (90041)
  4. How to create SPN account to allow Kerberos authentication using SmartConnect DNS entries (16528)
  5. How to reset a node to factory defaults (16696)
  6. Troubleshooting performance issues (88844)
  7. Visio Stencils of Isilon Cluster Storage Systems (90170)
  8. How to configure Windows DNS for a SmartConnect zone (183530)
  9. How to reimage a node using a USB flash drive (16582)
  10. Active Directory clients cannot connect to the cluster after the machine account password is changed (169843)

 

Top 10 product documents

To access these PDF documents, log in to the EMC Online Support site. Documents in bold are new to the top 10 list.

  1. Current Isilon Software Releases
  2. Isilon Supportability and Compatibility Guide
  3. OneFS 7.1 CLI Administration Guide
  4. OneFS 7.1.0 MR Release Notes
  5. OneFS 7.1 Web Administration Guide
  6. Current Isilon OneFS patches
  7. OneFS 7.0.2 Administration Guide
  8. OneFS 7.1 Release Notes
  9. OneFS 7.0.1 Administration Guide
  10. OneFS 7.0.2 Command Reference

 

If you have questions or feedback about this blog, send an email to isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, send an email to isicontent@emc.com.

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EMC Isilon OneFS 7.1.1 is now available!

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

The latest release of the EMC® Isilon® OneFS operating system is now available!

This blog post summarizes noteworthy new features of OneFS 7.1.1, highlights new OneFS 7.1.1 documentation, and provides steps for upgrading to OneFS 7.1.1.

New OneFS 7.1.1 features and enhancements

High-level technical overviews for several OneFS 7.1.1 new features and enhancements are provided below. They’re grouped together by the types of benefits they provide, such as performance improvement and security. Refer to OneFS 7.1.1 Release Notes and Technical Overview of New and Improved Features of EMC Isilon OneFS 7.1.1 for additional details.

Performance improvements

The following new features and enhancements help improve performance for most OneFS workflows:

  • SMB Multichannel support
    OneFS 7.1.1 supports the Multichannel feature of SMB 3.0, which establishes a single SMB session over multiple network connections. SMB Multichannel enables increased throughput, connection failure tolerance, and automatic discovery. To take advantage of this new feature, client computers must be configured with Microsoft Windows 8 or later, or Microsoft Windows Server 2012 or later with supported network interface cards (NICs). For more information, see the SMB Multichannel section of the OneFS 7.1.1 Web Administration Guide and OneFS 7.1.1 CLI Administration Guide.
  • SmartFlash caching
    In OneFS, level 1 (L1) cache uses random access memory (RAM) to store copies of system metadata and files requested from front-end networks. Level 2 (L2) cache uses RAM to store copies of file system metadata for files that are stored on the node that owns the data. SmartFlash, or level 3 (L3) cache, uses solid-state drives (SSDs) to hold file data and metadata released from L2 cache, increasing the total size of cache memory available in a cluster as well as the speed that you can retrieve data. In OneFS 7.1.1, SmartFlash is enabled by default for new node pools.
  • NDMP backup performance improvements
    OneFS 7.1.1 uses multiple threads to restore files, making data transfer occur as fast as the tape backup device can deliver it. Additional operational enhancements improve throughput when transferring small files.
  • SyncIQ® performance enhancements
    To allow multiple SyncIQ workers to replicate a single file simultaneously, SyncIQ now allows for file splitting, where a large file is split into segments, each of which is processed in parallel by a different thread.

Security and access zone enhancements

The following enhancements have been made to increase security and support Hadoop workflows:

  • Access zone enhancements
    Access zones have been restructured to enforce best practices and improve security. In OneFS 7.1.1, a root or a base directory must be designated for each access zone. SMB shares must subscribe to a single access zone, and access zones can no longer be used to share data. OneFS 7.1.1 also prevents access to non-system zones through NFS, SSH, and the OneFS web administration interface.To support security for Hadoop workflows and enable multiple unstructured datasets to be hosted on a single cluster, access zones now support an HDFS namespace per access zone. This means that you can now run multiple separate HDFS namespaces on the same cluster. Stay tuned for an upcoming ISI Knowledge blog post on this topic.
  • Self-encrypting drive enhancements
    This release of OneFS expands the availability of self-encrypting drives (SEDs) to provide data at-rest encryption capabilities across the entire node family. In addition to the 3TB and 4TB SEDs, OneFS 7.1.1 introduces a 900GB SAS SED HDD for S-Series nodes and an 800GB SED SSD for all supported nodes. For details, see the Isilon Product Availability Guide.
  • Auditing enhancements
    In OneFS 7.1.1, audit system configuration information can be forwarded to the audit log file for storage and analysis.
  • Role based access control enhancements
    New privileges have been added to the role based access control (RBAC) feature in OneFS 7.1.1, such as ISI_PRIV_IFS_BACKUP and ISI_PRIV_IFS_RESTORE. These privileges can be assigned to roles that enable users to back up and restore files that they don’t have explicit permissions to.

Manageability and drive firmware updates

The following OneFS 7.1.1 features make it easier to manage your Isilon cluster and obtain the latest drive firmware:

  • MMC integration
    Microsoft Windows administrators with the correct privileges can remotely administer a share through the MMC shared folders snap-in feature. This enables an administrator to connect to an access zone and directly manage all shares within that zone. To take advantage of this functionality, the Isilon cluster must be joined to an Active Directory domain from which the MMC console can be invoked.
  • Drive Support Package for non-disruptive drive firmware updates
    Drive support packages determine and apply updates for the drive’s firmware automatically, and eliminate the need to apply a patch and reboot the node when you replace or add drives. You can also configure alerts to indicate when you need to update your drive firmware. Review the Isilon Drive Support Package 1.0 release notes for information about system requirements and installation instructions.

For complete details about all of the OneFS 7.1.1 features and enhancements, including changes in functionality, fixed issues, and known issues in this release, refer to the OneFS 7.1.1 Release Notes.

OneFS 7.1.1 documentation and new guides available

A full list of OneFS 7.1.1 documents is available in the OneFS 7.1.1 Release Notes, on the Isilon online community and on the EMC Online Support site (login is required for the EMC Online Support site). This release also features two new guides:

  • OneFS Migration Tools Guide
    This guide describes how to migrate data from NetApp filers and EMC VNX storage systems to EMC Isilon clusters using the isi_vol_copy and isi_vol_copy_vnx tools.
  • OneFS API Reference 
    This guide—combining the former Platform and RAN API References—describes how the Isilon OneFS application programming interface (API) provides access to configure the cluster and access the data on the cluster. This guide also provides a list of all available API resource URLs, HTTP methods, and parameter and object descriptions.

How to upgrade to OneFS 7.1.1

If you want to upgrade to this new release, explore your upgrade options by reviewing the Isilon Supportability and Compatibility Guide and the OneFS Upgrade Planning and Process Guide.

Then, prepare for the upgrade process by reviewing the following documents:

After reviewing these documents, read the knowledge base article, “How to download OneFS 7.1.1 (172492)” (login to EMC Online Support is required).

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, send an email to isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, send an email to isicontent@emc.com.

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Find information about EMC Isilon OneFS patches in one document

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

EMC® Isilon® patch documentation has been updated, making it easier to find information about patches for the OneFS operating system. Previously, you had to check several separate documents for each supported version of OneFS to determine if a patch was available for a specific known issue. Now you can refer to a single document, Current Patches for EMC Isilon OneFS, (log in to the EMC Online Support site is required) to find information about any patch for any version of OneFS.

The best way to resolve known issues in OneFS is to upgrade to a recent OneFS maintenance release (MR). However, if you need a solution before an MR is released and a patch is available, you can download and install a patch. Often, Isilon will issue a standard patch for a specific issue or a rollup patch to fix issues within a component of OneFS. (Not every known issue is addressed with a patch.)
This consolidated document provides the benefit of reviewing all available patches of versions of OneFS. This can help you consider which version of OneFS that you want to upgrade to next.

All OneFS patches and current patch documentation are on the EMC Online Support site. For example, if EMC Isilon Technical Support provides your with a patch ID number, you can search for it in EMC Online Support by entering “patch-[ID number],” as shown in the image below. Or you can check the new reference, Current patches for OneFS. This document provides a current list of patches available for supported versions of OneFS.

Searching for patch ID numbers in the EMC Online Support site.

Searching for patch ID numbers in the EMC Online Support site.

How to download and install patches

For details about finding, downloading, and installing a patch. Watch the video “Understanding Patches for EMC Isilon OneFS” for an overview of patches and to learn the complete process for applying a patch to OneFS.

You can also read the knowledge base article “Understanding patches for EMC Isilon products (176358)” for a detailed description of the topics covered in the video.

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, send an email to isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, send an email to isicontent@emc.com.

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Top 20 EMC Isilon support documents in April 2014

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

One of the goals of this blog is to share the most useful EMC® Isilon® support-related content that we have to offer. In this post, we’re highlighting 20 of the most viewed knowledgebase (KB) articles and product documents from the month of April.

We hope these documents will help you to quickly find an answer to a common question or resolve an issue.

Top 10 KB articles

To access these KB articles, log in to the EMC Online Support site. Articles in bold are new to the top 10 list this month.

  1. OpenSSL Heartbeat Vulnerability (Heartbleed) in EMC products (185965)
  2. How to upgrade firmware on Intel (QLogic) 12300 and 12800 InfiniBand switches (170524)
  3. OneFS 7.1 SMB and Authentication Rollup Patch (174372)
  4. OneFS 7.0.2 SMB Rollup Patch (172623)
  5. Impact of OpenSSL “heartbleed” vulnerability in InsightIQ virtual machines (186055)
  6. Impact of CVE-2014-0160 OpenSSL “heartbleed” vulnerability on Isilon clusters (185961)
  7. Best practices for NFS client settings (90041)
  8. Patches available for EMC Isilon OneFS (88358)
  9. Troubleshooting performance issues (88844)
  10. How to create SPN accounts to allow Kerberos authentication using SmartConnect DNS entries (16528)

 

Top 10 product documents

To access these PDF documents, log in to the EMC Online Support site. Documents in bold are new to the top 10 list this month.

  1. OneFS 7.1 CLI Administration Guide
  2. Current Isilon Software Releases
  3. Isilon Supportability and Compatibility Guide
  4. OneFS 7.1 Web Administration Guide
  5. OneFS 7.1.0 MR Release Notes
  6. OneFS 7.0.1 Administration Guide
  7. OneFS 7.0.2 Administration Guide
  8. Current Patches for Isilon OneFS 7.0
  9. OneFS 7.0.2 Command Reference
  10. Current Patches for Isilon OneFS 7.1

 

If you have questions or feedback about this blog, send an email to isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, send an email to isicontent@emc.com.

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