Archive for the ‘Video’ Category

How to keep your EMC Isilon cluster from reaching capacity

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

It’s important to maintain enough free space on your EMC® Isilon® cluster to ensure that data is protected and workflows are not disrupted. At a minimum, you should have at least one node’s worth of free space available in case you need to protect data on a failing drive.

When your Isilon cluster fills up to more than 90% capacity, cluster performance is affected. Several issues can occur when your cluster fills up to 98% capacity, such as substantially slower performance, failed file operations, the inability to write or delete data, and the potential for data loss. It might take several days to resolve these issues. If you have a full cluster, nearly full cluster, or need assistance with maintaining enough free space, contact EMC Isilon Technical Support.

Fortunately, there are several best practices you can follow to help prevent your Isilon cluster from becoming too full. These are detailed in the “Best Practices Guide for Maintaining Enough Free Space on Isilon Clusters and Pools” (requires login to the EMC Online Support site). Some of these best practices are summarized in this blog post.

Monitoring cluster capacity

To prevent your cluster from becoming too full, monitor your cluster capacity. There are several ways to do this. For example, you can configure email event notification rules in the EMC Isilon OneFS® operating system to notify you when your cluster is reaching capacity. Watch the video “How to Set Up Email Notifications in OneFS When a Cluster Reaches Capacity” for a demonstration of this procedure.

Another way to monitor cluster capacity is to use EMC Isilon InsightIQ™ software. If you have InsightIQ licensed on your cluster, you can run FSAnalyze jobs in OneFS to create data for InsightIQ’s file system analytics tools. You can then use InsightIQ’s Dashboard and Performance Reporting to monitor cluster capacity. For example, Performance Reports enable you to view information about the activity of the nodes, networks, clients, disks, and more. The Storage Capacity section of a performance report displays the used and total storage capacity for the monitored cluster over time (Figure 1).

Figure 1: The Storage Capacity section of a Performance Report in InsightIQ 3.0.

Figure 1: The Storage Capacity section of a Performance Report in InsightIQ 3.0.

For more information about InsightIQ Performance Reports, see the InsightIQ User Guides, which can be found on the EMC Online Support site.

To learn about additional ways to monitor cluster capacity, such as using SmartQuotas, read “Best Practices Guide for Maintaining Enough Free Space on Isilon Clusters and Pools.”

More best practices

Follow these additional tips to maintain enough free space on your cluster:

  • Manage your data
    Regularly delete data that is rarely accessed or used.
  • Manage Snapshots
    Snapshots, which are used for data protection in OneFS, can take up space if they are no longer needed. Read the best practices guide for several best practices about managing snapshots, or read the blog post “EMC Isilon SnapshotIQ: An overview and best practices.”
  • Make sure all nodes in a node pool or disk pool are compatible
    If you have a node pool that contains a mix of different node capacities, you can receive “cluster full” errors even if only the smallest node in your node pool reaches capacity. To avoid this scenario, ensure that nodes in each node pool or disk pool are of compatible types. Read the best practices guide for information about node compatibility and for a procedure to verify that all nodes in each node pool are compatible.
  • Enable Virtual Hot Spare
    Virtual Hot Spare (VHS) keeps space in reserve in case you need to move data off of a failing drive (smartfail). VHS is enabled by default. For more information about VHS, read the knowledgebase article, “OneFS: How to enable and configure Virtual Hot Spare (VHS) (88964)” (requires login to the EMC Online Support site).
  • Enable Spillover
    Spillover allows data that is being sent to a full pool to be diverted to an alternate pool. If you have licensed EMC Isilon SmartPools™ software, you can designate a spillover location. For more information about SmartPools, read the OneFS Web Administration Guide.
  • Add nodes
    If you want to scale-out your storage to add more free space, contact your sales representative.

If you have questions or feedback about this blog or video described in it, send an email to isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, send an email to isicontent@emc.com.

 

Role-based access control in EMC Isilon OneFS 7.1: An overview

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

In EMC® Isilon® OneFS® 7.0 and 7.1, you can use role-based access control (RBAC) for administration tasks in place of a root or administrator account. A role is a collection of OneFS privileges that are limited to an area of administration. For example, you can create custom roles for security, auditing, storage, or backup tasks. Privileges are assigned to roles. As a user logs in to the cluster through the Platform API, the OneFS command-line interface, or the OneFS web administration interface, they’re granted privileges based on their role membership.

For information on how to create and manage roles through the OneFS command-line interface, see the OneFS 7.1 CLI Administration Guide – page 252 (requires login to the EMC Online Support site).

For an overview about RBAC in OneFS 7.1, watch the following video, “Enterprise Features in OneFS 7.1: Role Based Access Control.”

If you have questions or feedback, send an email to isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, send an email to isicontent@emc.com.

Video Transcript

Hello, I’m Andrey Tychkin with EMC Isilon.

In this video, we’ll talk about Role Based Access Control or RBAC, a feature of OneFS 7.1.

Role Based Access Control allows us to delegate specific administration tasks to users of the OneFS cluster.

Let’s take an example.

Let’s say I’m a NAS administrator and I want my Windows team to manage SMB administration on the cluster separate from, say, my UNIX team.

I’ll start by creating a role and giving it a meaningful name, such as SMB-ADMIN.

Once the role is created, I can add some privileges to it.

Privileges are sets of allowable actions.

They can be read-only for monitoring, or they can be read-write for actual configuration changes.

For SMB administration, I’ll need an SMB setting privilege and a WEB UI log in privilege.

We can also choose from one of the four predefined roles in OneFS which already have privileges assigned to them.

They are SecurityAdmin for RBAC administration, SystemAdmin for general system administration tasks, VMwareAdmin for managing backups of virtual machines, and AuditAdmin for Auditing.

Once we have our roles and privileges set up, all we need to do is add some members to it.

Members can be any users from authentication providers such as AD, LDAP, or NIS.

In our case, it’s our friend Mike from AD who, once he’s added to this role, he’s able to administer SMB on this cluster.

Role based access control is managed from the CLI by using the isi auth roles command.

Detailed information on RBAC is available in the OneFS Administration Guide.

If you have questions or want to implement OneFS 7.1 features in your environment, please contact your account team.

Thank you for watching.

Locating serial numbers for EMC Isilon nodes

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein
The serial number for an EMC Isilon X200 node.

The serial number for an EMC Isilon X200 node.

To open a service request for EMC® Isilon® Technical Support, you’ll need to provide a node serial number. You can easily retrieve this information from the back of the node (or the front of A100 nodes), from the OneFS web administration interface, or from the OneFS command-line interface.

For a demonstration of the OneFS web administration or command-line interface procedures, or to see what the serial number for a particular node looks like, watch the following video, “How to Find Serial Numbers for EMC Isilon Nodes.” Or, read the related knowledgebase article, “How to find serial numbers for EMC Isilon nodes,” for a written description of these procedures (requires login to the EMC Online Support site).

If you have questions or feedback about this blog or videos, email isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, email isicontent@emc.com.

Video Transcript

Hello. I’m André Morrissen, a Senior Technical Writer at EMC.

Before you can log a case with EMC Isilon Technical Support, you’ll need to obtain the serial number of the affected nodes.

In this video, we’ll show you how to obtain a serial number from the physical node, using the EMC Isilon OneFS web administration interface, or using the OneFS command-line interface.

First, let’s look at how the format of serial numbers depends on the type of node.

For the current generation of EMC Isilon storage nodes, which include the S200, X200, X400,

NL400, serial numbers begin with the letter “S”, followed by the family code, the chassis code, the generation, and lastly, a ten-digit number.

The following example illustrates a serial number for an X200 node.

The serial number for an A100 performance or backup accelerator node starts with FC61S, followed by 9 digits, as seen in the following example.

For legacy Isilon IQ-Series nodes, the serial number format depends on the age of the node.

For newer IQ-Series 2U nodes with 12 drives and 4U nodes with 36 drives, serial numbers start with a letter that designates the node type:

“A” for accelerator nodes

“D” for EX storage expansion nodes

And “G”, “K”, “M”, or “R” for standard storage nodes

Nine digits follow the letter and the serial number ends with an “L”, as seen in the following example.

Serial numbers for older IQ-Series 2U nodes with 12 drives start with eight digits and end with the letter “S”.

Now let’s look at the three ways to find your node’s serial number.

If you have access to the physical node, the serial number is printed on a sticker.

For most nodes, the sticker is on the back of the node.

For A100 accelerator nodes, first remove the face plate from the front of the node.

Press both latches in simultaneously until they click, then remove the face plate.

Locate the black plastic tab on the top left of the node and slide it out.

The serial number is printed on the blue label.

When you’re done, slide the tab back in and replace the face plate.

First, log in to the OneFS web administration interface.

The Cluster Status page displays by default. If you’re on a different page, you’ll need to navigate there.

If you’re running OneFS 6.5 or earlier, click Status, then click Cluster Status.

If you’re running OneFS 7.0 or 7.1, click Dashboard, Cluster Overview, then click Cluster Status.

We’ll continue this demonstration using OneFS 7.1.

The Status section lists all the nodes in your cluster and their node numbers.

Locate the number for the affected node in the ID column and click it to view the information for that node.

The Node Status tab identifies the serial number along with other information for that node.

First, open an SSH connection on any node in the cluster and log in using the “root” account.

Then, run the following command to display information for all nodes in your cluster: isi_for_array -s isi_hw_status -i

Each line of output starts with the cluster name, followed by the node number. The output is displayed per node in numerical order.

For example, this block of output is for node 3 in the cluster.

Locate the serial number for the affected node.

For a written description of how to find node serial numbers, see the following knowledgebase article.

If you need assistance with this procedure, contact EMC Isilon Technical Support.

Thanks for watching.

EMC Isilon SnapshotIQ: An overview and best practices

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

If you want to capture a moment in time with a camera, you snap a picture. When you want to capture the data on your cluster at a moment in time with the EMC® Isilon® OneFS® operating system, you take a snapshot.

EMC Isilon SnapshotIQ™ is a licensed software module that lets you create new snapshots and manage snapshot schedules. In this blog post, you’ll learn about SnapshotIQ basics and best practices.

SnapshotIQ overview

A snapshot is taken at a directory-level. The snapshot maintains an image of data that existed in that directory at that moment when the snapshot was created, even if the data changes. Taking a snapshot is an instantaneous operation. Rather than create a redundant copy of the data blocks, snapshots use pointers to reference current blocks on the cluster. Because of this, snapshots do not consume additional disk space unless the data referenced by the snapshot is modified. If the files are modified, the snapshot stores read-only copies of the original blocks.

Image provided by Patrick Kreuch

Image provided by Patrick Kreuch

Snapshots are the foundation for data protection strategies in OneFS. Snapshots are also used by the EMC Isilon SyncIQ™ software module to replicate a consistent point-in-time image of a directory from one cluster to another.

Watch the following video, “Data Protection and Disaster Recovery with Isilon SnapshotIQ,” to learn how to manage snapshots with the SnapshotIQ module. EMC Isilon Senior Solutions Architect, Chris Klosterman, answers the following frequently asked questions:

  • What is a snapshot and why do I need it?
  • How does SnapshotIQ work?
  • Where does OneFS store snapshots?
  • What are some example schedules?
  • How is data restored?
  • When do OneFS snapshots expire and how is the snapshot space reclaimed?
  • Can I modify data in a snapshot?

SnapshotIQ best practices

You may find that working with a large number of snapshots can become challenging to manage. Consider the following best practices to improve snapshot management and avoid cluster performance degradation.

  • Do not create more than 1,000 snapshots of a single directory.
  • Consider the depth of the directory path when creating snapshots. If the path is too high on the directory tree, it will cost more cluster resources to modify data referenced by the snapshot. If the path is too deep, you may need to create more snapshot schedules, which can be difficult to manage.
  • Create an alias name for your snapshot schedules in the OneFS web administration interface. Use the alias name to help you look up the most recent snapshot generated from a schedule.
  • Do not disable the snapshot delete job in the OneFS Job Engine.

For additional best practices and details about SnapshotIQ, see the “Snapshots” section in the OneFS Administration Guide.

If you have questions or feedback about this blog or these videos, email isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, email isicontent@emc.com.

EMC Isilon SmartLock: An overview and demonstration

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

EMC Isilon supports multiple data protection strategies for your cluster environment. Last month, we featured a video about EMC Isilon SyncIQ™, which uses snapshot technology to replicate changed blocks of data. If you want to apply Write Once Read Many (WORM) data protection to files on your cluster, consider EMC Isilon SmartLock™. SmartLock is Isilon’s licensed software-based approach to WORM data protection and retention.

We have two videos to help you become more familiar with SmartLock. The first video, “Data Protection with EMC Isilon SmartLock,” provides an overview about SmartLock features and functionality. The second video, “Technical Demo: EMC Isilon SmartLock,” provides a demonstration of several procedures in the OneFS command-line interface, such as creating SmartLock directories and setting a default retention period.

SmartLock overview

When you license SmartLock for your cluster, you can have a mix of files with normal protection and files with WORM (or SmartLock) protection. With SmartLock, you designate SmartLock directories and select files in those directories to commit to SmartLock status. During the commit process, files are assigned a retention period: a period. During this retention period, files cannot be modified or deleted.

SmartLock operates in either Enterprise or Compliance mode. Compliance mode enables you to meet specific regulatory compliance requirements, such as SEC 17a-4 requirements. If you run SmartLock in Compliance mode, the entire cluster operates in Compliance mode and cannot be reverted to Enterprise mode.

In the following video, EMC Isilon Solutions Architect Russ Stevenson covers these concepts in more detail and answers the following frequently asked questions:

  • What is SmartLock?
  • What are the options for setting up and configuring SmartLock?
  • How does the privileged delete function work?
  • How do I commit a file to SmartLock status?
  • What is SmartLock compliance mode?

SmartLock technical demo

If you’re already familiar with SmartLock and want to learn more about some common commands, the following video offers demonstrations of these procedures:

  • Initial configuration
  • Default retention period
  • File commitment and properties
  • Explicit retention period
  • Retention date override
  • Privileged delete

For questions and feedback about this blog or videos, email isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, email isicontent@emc.com.

How to collect files for EMC Isilon Technical Support

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

Collect Files for EMC Isilon Technical SupportWhen working with EMC Isilon Technical Support to troubleshoot an issue with your cluster, you may be asked to send your cluster’s log and configuration files to an Isilon Support Engineer. To do this, you’ll need to run a process to collect this information. This process creates a single file that contains all of your cluster’s log and configuration information. This file is then automatically uploaded to the Isilon FTP site where the Support Engineer can access it.

To start this process, follow one of these procedures:

  • From the OneFS web administration interface:
    • In OneFS 7.0.x through 7.1, go to Help > Diagnostics and click Start Gather
    • In OneFS 6.0.x through 6.5.x, go to Help > Diagnostics > Gather Info and click Start Gather
  • From the OneFS command-line interface, run the isi_gather_info command

For more information

Watch the video “How to Collect Files for EMC Isilon Technical Support” for a demonstration of these procedures.

This video is based on the popular Knowledgebase (KB) article “How to collect node information, including log files” (log in to the EMC Online Support site to view this article). The KB article provides a written description of these procedures and links to related articles such as “How to upload files to Isilon Technical Support”.

For questions and feedback about this blog or videos, email isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, email isicontent@emc.com.

Video Transcript

Hello, I’m Kirsten Gantenbein, a Senior Technical Writer at EMC Isilon.

Log and configuration files can help EMC Isilon Technical Support troubleshoot and resolve issues with your cluster.

In this video, we look at how to collect these files using the Isilon OneFS web administration interface and the command line interface.

First let’s use the OneFS web administration interface.

Log in to any node in your cluster using the root account.

Depending on the version of OneFS you’re running, the next step is different.

On OneFS 7.0 and later, click Help then click Diagnostics.

On OneFS 6.5 and earlier, click Help, point to Diagnostics, and then click Gather Info.

The steps are the same for all versions from this point. We’ll continue this demonstration on OneFS 7.0.

Click Start Gather.

It takes several minutes to gather the log and configuration files.

In the Log section, click Expand to see when each stage of the gather process is complete.

When the gather process is complete, the files are automatically uploaded to the Isilon FTP site.

The Archived Info Manager section contains a list of gathered files, the date they were gathered, and the size of the file.

You can also use the command line to gather log and configuration files.

Open an SSH connection to any node in the cluster and log in using the root account.

Run the isi_gather_info command.

The gather process begins and progress information appears.

As with the web administration interface, the process takes several minutes.

When the gather process is complete, the files are automatically uploaded to the Isilon FTP site.

For a list of additional options, run the isi_gather_info –h command.

For a written description of how to gather log and configuration files, see the following knowledge base article.

If you need assistance with this procedure, contact EMC Isilon Technical Support.

Thanks for watching.

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Data Protection and Disaster Recovery with EMC Isilon SyncIQ

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

To prepare for disaster scenarios, such as an unplanned outage that can potentially compromise your data, you need a solution that creates and safely stores copies of your data.

EMC Isilon SyncIQ is Isilon’s data replication software and a key element of a robust data protection and disaster recovery solution. SyncIQ works with the underlying snapshot technology of EMC Isilon SnapshotIQ software to copy data blocks that change between replications. The replication process is completed quickly and with minimal disruption.

In this video, Principal Solutions Architect Amol Choukekar, answers frequently asked questions about SyncIQ. Watch this video to gain a basic understanding of the technical concepts and functionality of SyncIQ. For more information, contact your EMC Isilon account representative.

Video Transcript

Hello. This is Amol Choukekar, Principal Solutions Architect with EMC Isilon storage division.

Today, I’m going to talk about EMC Isilon SyncIQ and how it helps in implementing a disaster recovery and data protection strategy.

In this video, we’ll talk about EMC Isilon SyncIQ’s design features, basic functionality, and the operations associated with it.

SyncIQ is EMC Isilon’s data replication feature.

It is a licensed feature of OneFS and it replicates data from one cluster to another cluster, asynchronously, over a standard LAN or WAN connection.

SyncIQ allows creating user-defined policies that can be scheduled to replicate data to meet data recovery point objectives.

SyncIQ maintains the integrity of data by copying the data as well as the metadata, like permissions associated with files and directories.

SyncIQ uses underlying snapshot technology that performs block-based delta copies between replications.

This results in tremendous WAN bandwidth savings and shrinks the time needed to keep the data in sync between two clusters.

SyncIQ is typically set up to replicate data from a single source cluster to a single target cluster in a one-to-one relationship.

However, SyncIQ is capable of replicating from a single source cluster to multiple target clusters in a one-to-many relationship.

As we can see in this example here, we have a dataset, D1, replicating to both cluster 2 and cluster 3 in a one-to-many relationship.

At the same time, we can see that we have cluster 1 and cluster 3 with independent datasets participating in a SyncIQ relationship in a bi-directional fashion.

Thus, we can say that SyncIQ can perform one-to-one, one-to-many, and bi-directional replication with independent datasets.

Starting with EMC Isilon OneFS 7.0, SyncIQ functionality has been enhanced for ease of failover and failback.

Now, let’s take a look at the operations associated with SyncIQ.

As we can see in the example on the whiteboard here, we have a production side and we have a disaster recovery side. We have data on the production side in read-write mode and we have data on the disaster recovery side as read-only. This is marked read-only to maintain the integrity of the data.

Now, let’s talk about failover. Failover can be temporary or failover can be permanent in case of a disaster.

Now, let’s talk about a temporary failover. For example, a DR testing scenario.

What is failover? Failover is nothing but marking the target directory on the disaster recovery side as read-write.

Now, let’s say in case this was temporary, and we are done with the disaster recovery test, we wrote some data, D2, as in this example, and we want to continue the normal operation as it was before.

What would need to happen is a process called as a “failover revert”.

What is failover revert? Failover revert is nothing but discarding the changes that were written while we were in a read-write state and marking the target side back as read-only so that normal processing can continue.

Now, what happens in case of an actual disaster?

You would have your production side inaccessible.

You’ll initiate a failover process which marks the target side as read-write and you would point your clients to the target side or the disaster recovery side, and you continue writing new data to it, D2, D3, in this case.

Let’s say after a period of time, the production side comes back up and we want to go back to the original production, there’s a couple of processes that need to happen.

While we were on the disaster recovery side, we wrote some new data, which is significant data now.

That needs to get copied back to the production side and that is done through what is called as a “failback” process.

So, what is a failback process? Failback process is reversing the direction of the SyncIQ policy and copying all the changes from the disaster recovery side to the production side.

So you would have your D2 and your D3 copied to the production side.

Once that is done, a normal failover can be initiated, where we can mark the production side as read-write and we can continue your normal operations in the same direction from production to disaster recovery side and mark disaster recovery side back as read-only and continue replicating data to it.

As we saw in this video, SyncIQ provides powerful functionality for disaster recovery and data protection.

If you have any further questions about SyncIQ and would like to implement SyncIQ in your environment, please feel free to contact your EMC account team or EMC Business Partner.

Thank you for watching.

A closer look at EMC Isilon SmartDedupe and the Isilon OneFS 7.1 Job Engine

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

We recently learned that our blog readers are most interested in the new EMC Isilon SmartDedupe software offering and the Job Engine enhancements incorporated into in the recently released EMC Isilon OneFS 7.1.

In this video, we take a closer look at these features. First, we cover basic concepts about SmartDedupe and Job Engine performance enhancements in OneFS 7.1. Next, we provide brief demonstrations of how to use these features in the OneFS web administration interface. This video also highlights details about data at rest encryption in OneFS 7.1.

Download the EMC Isilon OneFS 7.1 release notes for more information. You can also review the video transcript below.

Video Transcript

Hello, I’m André Morrissen, a Senior Technical Writer with the Information Development team.

Version 7.1 of OneFS contains numerous enhancements that will improve the performance of your Isilon cluster.

In this video, we’ll take a look at a SmartDedupe, job engine improvements, and data at rest encryption and find out how they can improve your workflow.

SmartDedupe is a new licensed feature of OneFS which enables you to save storage space on your cluster by reducing redundant data—in other words, by deduplicating that data.

SmartDedupe is most beneficial for workflows that incorporate large amounts of duplicate data, such as archiving or when a large amount of virtual machines are stored on a cluster.

As you write files to the cluster, some of those files or blocks of data in the files might be duplicates. You can run a deduplication job that scans the file system to see if that data already exists. If it does, OneFS moves that data to a hidden file called a shadow store and replaces the duplicate data in the files with a pointer to the shadow store.

Deduplication is applied at the subdirectory level and targets all files and directories underneath one or more root directories.

The deduplication job is set to run at low priority by default, so impact to your workflow should be minimal. However, it’s a good idea to wait until users have finished modifying their files on the cluster before you run the job.

You can perform the following deduplication tasks from the OneFS web administration interface.

Assign specific subdirectories for deduplication.

Run an assessment job to determine how much space you might save in a given directory.

And view detailed reports of deduplication jobs.

OneFS 7.1 includes major improvements to the job engine, the system that helps you schedule and manage maintenance jobs on your cluster.

As with previous versions of OneFS, the job engine can adjust jobs based on the amount of cluster resources available. For example, if clients require more system resources, threads allocated to the job engine are decreased.

However, now you can run up to three jobs simultaneously, with a few exceptions that keep similar types of jobs from colliding. For example, you can run an AutoBalance, IntegrityScan, and DedupeAssessment job all at the same time.

OneFS 7.1 also introduces support for Data at Rest Encryption.  With this feature, you’ll be able to create a cluster of nodes that contain self-encrypting drives or SEDs. Data at Rest Encryption provides data security that meets specific regulatory requirements for financial and governmental workflows.

Isilon’s use of hardware-based encryption provides the following benefits:

Less consumption of system resources.

Removed drives remain encrypted, which prevents data theft.

The data encryption is performed at the drive level using special processors on each SED that provide 256-bit AES encryption protection. The encryption has less than 1% impact on the performance of the drives themselves.

If you’re interested in creating a cluster with SEDs and using Data at Rest Encryption, contact your account representative.

For more information about the features in this videos, see the OneFS Web Administration.

For a full list of new features, see the OneFS 7.1 Release Notes.

Thanks for watching.

How to start a job in the EMC Isilon OneFS Job Engine

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

Optimizing free space on your Isilon cluster.

Scanning the file system to ensure that data is protected.

Removing duplicate data.

These are examples of cluster maintenance tasks that are managed by the Job Engine, a work distribution service in the EMC Isilon OneFS operating system.

The Job Engine plays an important role in maintaining the reliability and integrity of your cluster, and is well documented on the EMC Online Support site. It’s also a popular feature with customers, as indicated by our recent poll results.

This post provides a brief overview of the Job Engine and a video demonstration of how to start a job.

Job Engine basics

The Job Engine prioritizes, schedules, and balances the amount of resources dedicated to a specific set of tasks, or jobs, that run in the background. Specifically, the Job Engine distributes job segments—broken into phases and tasks—across the nodes in your Isilon cluster. For a list of cluster maintenance jobs that are managed by the Job Engine, see the OneFS administration guides or the knowledgebase article titled OneFS 5.0 – 7.0: Complete list of jobs by OneFS version. (Log in to the EMC Online Support site to view this article and OneFS administration guides.)

You can review the schedule of jobs and monitor the progress of running jobs in the OneFS web administration interface or command-line interface. Because some jobs can take many hours to complete or consume a significant amount of resources while running, you can also manually start, pause, or stop jobs. If a job is paused, you can restart the job at any time from the point at which it was interrupted.

In OneFS versions 6.0.x through 7.0.x, only one job can run at a time in the background. In OneFS 7.1, up to three jobs can run at the same time (with a few exceptions to keep similar types of jobs from interfering with each other). Each job has a default impact policy and priority to determine when it will run. You can also modify these default settings when you start a job.

How to start a job

If you want to start a job before it is scheduled to run automatically, you can start it manually. This basic procedure for OneFS 6.0.x through 7.0.x is described in the following video.

To start a job in OneFS 7.1, go to Cluster Management > Job Operations > Job Types click More (circled in red below), and then click Start Job.

How to start a job in Isilon OneFS 7.1

How to start a job in OneFS 7.1.

Additional details about the Job Engine in OneFS 7.1 can be found in the recently updated white paper titled EMC Isilon OneFS: A Technical Overview.

Are you looking for more specific information about job management in OneFS? Let us know. Send an email to isi.knowledge@emc.com, or post a comment on this blog.

How to find Isilon content on EMC Online Support

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

When you have a question about an EMC Isilon product, where should you start?

The EMC Online Support website is the good place to visit for information about Isilon products. Log onto support.emc.com to access Isilon support content such as:

  • Current Isilon software and firmware releases
  • Supportability and compatibility guides
  • Knowledgebase articles
  • Administration guides
  • Patches for Isilon OneFS
  • OneFS release notes
  • Product downloads

Quickly find Isilon support content

EMC Online Support uses a product-focused navigation and search engine infrastructure. It helps to focus your search on the Isilon product you’re most interested in. Start at the Support by Product page and select a product, such as Isilon OneFS. You’ll land on the OneFS support page, which contains links to useful content and topics.

For more tips on how to quickly locate the information you need, watch our ID.TV video, “How to find Isilon content on EMC Online Support.”