Archive for the ‘Video’ Category

Now on YouTube: Cool Commands videos

Andre Morrisen

Andre Morrisen

Instructional Video Producer at EMC/Isilon
Andre Morrisen

Latest posts by Andre Morrisen (see all)

If you’ve been tuning in to the Cluster Talk audio podcast, you’ll know that there’s a segment each episode called “Cool Commands” where they talk about a OneFS command and its application. As an extension of this, we’ve created a video-based version of Cool Commands that focuses on how to find out general or specific information or complete certain tasks.

The first episode describes how to find basic cluster health and job information using commands like isi status and isi job status. In the video, you’ll see the command syntax and we’ll highlight important parts of the output. You’ll also learn how to interpret the output to identify potential issues that might affect your cluster’s performance. The second and third episodes describe how to troubleshoot file access issues on Windows and UNIX clients, respectively. These episodes include a great analogy for how permissions work and step by step troubleshooting to resolve a file access issue.

In future episodes, we’ll describe how to change permissions on UNIX files and folders using chmod and changing the ownership of UNIX files and folders using chown. All the Cool Commands episodes are published on the Isilon Support playlist on EMC’s YouTube Channel. If you have any questions about the videos or suggestions for future episodes, we’d love to hear from you.

Cool Commands Episodes

Bookmark the Isilon Support playlist and check out the Cool Commands videos, then let us know what you think. If you have feedback for us about this or any other Isilon technical content, email us at isicontent@emc.com. And thank you!

Decode the EMC Isilon HD400 Node

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

If you’re looking to archive several petabytes of data, you might want to consider the new EMC Isilon HD400 node. It’s the biggest of the current Isilon nodes in terms of size—you can store up to 354 TB of data on 59 hard drives using a 4U rack space.

To learn more about the external and internal components of the HD400 node, watch the video, Decode the Node: EMC Isilon HD400.

HD400 and OneFS 7.2

The HD400 node was released with the Isilon OneFS operating system 7.2. The OneFS 7.2 release provides support for the following items required for the HD400:

  • New protection levels: New requested protection levels are available in OneFS 7.2 to account for the increased capacity of HD400 nodes. For example, the default protection level for node pools on the HD400 node is “3d:1n1d,” which means that data is protected in case 3 drives fail or if 1 node and 1 drive fail.
  • L3 cache: The HD400 node includes 800 GB of solid-state drive (SSD) storage, which is primarily used for L3 cache. This helps to reduce cache cycling times to improve system performance. For more information, see the L3 Cache Overview topic in the OneFS 7.2 Web Administration Guide or OneFS 7.2 CLI Administration Guide.
  • New drive layout: Disks in the HD400 are arranged in a grid orientation because the drives are inserted top-down into the node chassis. To view the new grid orientation in the OneFS 7.2 web administration interface, go to Dashboard > Cluster Status and click on the ID number. This will take you to the Node Status view, where you can scroll down to view the grid orientation.

    HD400 grid in the OneFS 7.2 web administration  interface.

    HD400 grid in the OneFS 7.2 web administration interface.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have questions about the HD400 node, join the Ask the Expert session on HD400 and OneFS 7.2 that continues through March 8, 2015 in the Isilon Community. Look through the discussion thread for useful information. Or post a question, and you’ll get answers from Isilon hardware and software experts, partners, and customers.

HD400 documentation

If you’re looking for an HD400 specification sheet, a hardware installation guide, or a HD400 field replacement unit (FRU) video, visit the HD400 Info Hub in the Isilon Community. This information hub is a curation destination for links to the latest and most relevant documentation for installing, maintaining, and servicing HD400 nodes.

The HD400 Info Hub on the Isilon Community

The HD400 Info Hub on the Isilon Community.

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, or comments about the video specifically, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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How EMC Isilon and Hadoop work together

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

Hadoop is a hot topic. The Hadoop open-source platform opens up exciting possibilities for mining big data, and many organizations are exploring how to incorporate Hadoop solutions into their day-to-day operations. EMC Isilon offers an enterprise Hadoop solution, and we have a comprehensive set of documentation describing how to implement Hadoop on an EMC Isilon cluster.

But implementing Hadoop distributions can be a complex process. The Isilon approach is different from traditional Hadoop deployments, and we often get general questions about how Isilon clusters actually work with Hadoop data analytic platform.

To help answer your questions, our team has created a new Isilon and Hadoop overview video that describes the basic architecture and functionality of how Isilon clusters and a Hadoop platform work together.

In this video, you’ll learn:

  • How Isilon separates storage resources from compute resources
  • How HDFS is supported as a native protocol in OneFS
  • How OneFS protects Hadoop data using enterprise data protection features
  • Which distributions Isilon supports, and how to find more information

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, or comments about the video specifically, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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New EMC Isilon videos for a new year!

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

Happy New Year! I hope you had a wonderful holiday season!

December was a busy month. I recently shared a survey about which EMC® Isilon® OneFS® topics you would like to learn more about. I’ll announce the survey results and the new Hacker How-To series topic next week.

We also published two videos in December that you can view now.

Technical Demo: EMC Isilon OneFS Simulator

You can now spin up your own virtual OneFS 7.2 cluster. This technical demo video shows you how to download and extract the OneFS Simulator file from the EMC Isilon OneFS Operating System Simulator Download website. It then provides steps for setting up a VMware® player, gathering configuration details, and creating a three-node virtual cluster.

Technical Demo: EMC Isilon SnapshotIQ

This demo video walks you through common configuration tasks using the OneFS web administration and command-line interfaces, such as creating, viewing, reverting, and deleting snapshots.

Stayed tuned to our Isilon Support playlist and the EMC Isilon online community for upcoming videos.

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

Behind the scenes: Making the Access Zones technical demo video

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein
Amol Choukekar

Amol Choukekar

The Offer & Enablement (O&E) team within the EMC® Isilon® Professional Services department is a well-oiled machine when it comes to making videos. In the past year, they’ve played a key role in conceptualizing and collaborating to develop almost a third of the videos published to the Isilon Support YouTube playlist—from whiteboard videos to technical demos—that demonstrate how features of the OneFS® operating system work.

Principal Solutions Architect Amol Choukekar describes the story behind the origin and production of their latest video, Technical Demo: Access Zones in OneFS 7.1.1. In this interview, you’ll learn how frequently asked questions from customers about Access Zone configuration and directory layouts inspired the O&E team to create this video.

Q: Tell us about your team and why you produce these videos?

A: Our team is comprised of solutions architects and technical program managers who all contribute to making these videos. There is a lot of effort that goes into these projects. Specifically, creating and revising the script and setting up the demo environments that we use to create these videos.

Our main objective in producing these videos is to demonstrate OneFS features in a simple-to-follow format. The value for our customers and partners is to use the knowledge gained in the video and then apply that to their EMC Isilon solution.

Q: Why was Access Zones selected as a topic for a technical demo?

A: Access Zones was initially introduced in the OneFS 7.0 release. The OneFS 7.1.1 release includes interesting changes to the Access Zones feature, such as the concept of a zone-base directory. Other feature changes include zone-specific SMB shares, which eliminate the duplicate share name issue that existed in previous versions of OneFS (login is required to view Isilon OneFS 7.1.1 Release Notes). Also, our HDFS support is now zone-aware, which is becoming very popular. These changes represent another step in the evolution of our scale out multi-tenancy story in OneFS. The purpose of the video is to make our customers aware of these important changes.

Q: What were some frequently asked questions about Access Zones that helped you develop the script?

A: One of the criteria in configuring Access Zones is the zone-base directory, because a main criteria in configuring a OneFS cluster is to correctly lay out the directory structure. Our field teams were frequently asked questions about directory layout. For example, when we configure Access Zones or our cluster, where should we base our zone directory considering the various workflows and data segregation needs? This is an important design decision when deploying a scale-out network attached storage (NAS) solution such as EMC Isilon.

One of the objectives of the video was to demonstrate the proper use of the OneFS directory path convention. For example, with /ifs as the cluster root path, the best practices we’ve seen in the field for creating the directory layout is to use a /ifs/clustername/zonename/ structure. That can become your Access Zone rule, and then you can create SMB shares under that directory.

Zone-based directories in OneFS 7.1.1

Zone-base directories in OneFS 7.1.1

Q: What were some of the other goals when making this video?

A: The other goals for the video were to demonstrate the new Access Zone feature in a simplistic way without using any technical jargon. We really wanted the audience to easily grasp the concepts because these are the building blocks for the OneFS solution.And we wanted to demonstrate the feature in a workflow format to help the viewer understand the concepts related to Access Zones.

Q: What were some of the challenges when making this video?

A: While the content of the video is introductory, there was a lot of effort put in by our technical program managers to create the environment and make sure that the technical steps were complete and easily reproducible. Although it was a bit time consuming, it was not difficult at all because OneFS is one of the easiest NAS operating systems that I have ever worked with.

Q: What else would you like to add?

A: We hope all of our viewers find this useful. If you do find it useful, we highly encourage you to share it with your peers, customers, or anybody that uses OneFS and needs to configure Access Zones. And provide us with feedback on this video or existing videos, or suggestions for new topics.

[Editor’s note: please provide your feedback and suggestions by sending an email to isicontent@emc.com]

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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Racking EMC Isilon nodes

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

With EMC® Isilon® scale-out storage, it’s easy to add performance and capacity to your cluster simply by adding new nodes. For example, after you acquire a new node, a certified technician locates an open space in a rack (either 2U or 4U, depending on the node size), installs rails, installs the node into the rack, connects the network and InfiniBand cables, and then joins the node to the cluster. After joining the node, you’ll have more space and performance capacity right away.EMC Isilon 4U rail kit installation

The node installation process is simple and fast; but be sure to take the time to check that the nodes are safely secured to the rails and rack to minimize the risk of personal injury and damage to equipment.

Check out the following videos, which show the proper procedures for racking EMC Isilon 2U and 4U nodes, including both node installation and node removal from a rack.

Installing a node into a rack

Isilon nodes mount in a standard 19-inch wide rack and use a sliding rail system. Watch the following videos to learn how to install 2U and 4U nodes into a standard rack with 3/8-inch square holes.

For written descriptions of these procedures, see the EMC Isilon 2U rail kit installation guide and 4U rail kit installation guide, which are available on the EMC Online Support site (login is required).

Removing a node from a rack

If you need to remove nodes from the rack to service them or because you’re relocating your cluster, it’s important to be sure that you always shut down nodes as described in the knowledge base article, How to safely shut down an Isilon cluster prior to a schedule power outage (16529). If you don’t shut down a node properly, you increase the risk of data loss.

After the node is shut down, you can remove a 2U node and a 4U node from a rack. Watch the following videos to learn the safest way to remove these nodes from a rack.

For written descriptions of these procedures, see the node removal guides on the EMC Online Support site.

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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How EMC Isilon InsightIQ helps keep your cluster running smoothly

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

We highlighted a crucial cluster maintenance task in a recent blog post: monitoring cluster performance and storage capacity. Now, we’d like to take a closer look at InsightIQ™—a remarkably useful tool for monitoring your EMC® Isilon® cluster. As a licensed software module for the OneFS® operating system, InsightIQ makes it possible for you to monitor one or more clusters.

InsightIQ provides charts, graphs, and customized reports to help you understand how your cluster is performing. To learn how InsightIQ 3.0 works, watch the EMC Isilon InsightIQ Overview video, where Corporate Systems Engineer Jason Sturgeon describes the architecture of InsightIQ and shows you how to use InsightIQ reports.

How reports can help with monitoring

InsightIQ enables you to create customized reports to display data about clusters over specific periods of time. There are two general types of reports: performance reports and file system reports.

Performance reports

By monitoring cluster performance and data usage, you can help to ensure that your cluster runs smoothly. In the InsightIQ overview video, learn how to create a performance report to check cluster activity and a file system report to visualize data usage over time.

For example, if your cluster is running slowly, you can run a performance report and review the external network throughput rate. In the following figure, the performance report shows that one node is handling more network traffic than other nodes. With this information, you can redirect network traffic to other nodes and improve cluster performance.

A performance report that shows which node is handling the majority of network traffic.

A performance report in InsightIQ 3.0 that shows which node is handling the majority of network traffic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

File system report

InsightIQ reports can also help you to monitor cluster data usage by generating a file system report. The video describes a use case where you can explore data growth in a directory over time. For example, after running a file system report you might notice that a directory is storing a large amount of data (see the following figure). If this data hasn’t been accessed for a long time, you can approach the directory owner to determine whether this data can be deleted to increase storage capacity.

A file system report that shows a directory storing a large amount of data.

A file system report in InsightIQ 3.0 that shows a directory storing a large amount of data.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about reporting capabilities in InsightIQ, refer to the InsightIQ documentation on the EMC Online Support site (login required).

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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Five preventative maintenance tasks for your EMC Isilon cluster

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

131704545The last thing you want is for your cluster to go down because of an issue that could have been avoided. Performing routine cluster maintenance is important for keeping your EMC® Isilon® cluster up-and-running.

Five simple cluster maintenance tasks are highlighted in the new video, “How to Keep Your EMC Isilon Cluster Running Smoothly.” You can also find these tasks and more in the Isilon Cluster Preventative Maintenance Checklist (login to the EMC Online Support site is required).

Here’s a summary of the five tasks covered in the video:

  1. Subscribe to Isilon product advisories and updates in the EMC Online Support site. After you subscribe, regular Isilon documentation updates, EMC Technical Advisories, and more will be delivered directly to your email inbox.
  2. Check your cluster’s physical environment. Check the temperature, humidity, and power distribution unit (PDU) of your data center on a regular basis. You can also consult the Isilon Site Preparation and Planning Guide for environmental thresholds and requirements to protect your hardware from physical damage.
  3. Review the status of data protection jobs each month. Whether you’re using Isilon SnapshotIQ™, SyncIQ™, or NDMP for data replication or backups, it’s important to check the reports in the OneFS web administration interface or the log files of these tools to make sure your data is constantly protected. By routinely checking for any failed jobs, you have time to address them before you find yourself in a scenario where you need to recover data.
  4. Monitor cluster capacity daily. One of the most important things you can do to ensure that your cluster runs smoothly is to prevent it from reaching capacity. There are several best practices you can follow to maintain enough free space, which are summarized in an ISI Knowledge blog post, and the file system section of the Isilon Cluster Preventative Maintenance Checklist. The video below demonstrates how to monitor cluster usage by either checking the dashboard in the OneFS web administration interface or running performance reports using Isilon InsightIQ™.
  5. Check for cluster software and firmware every six months. Specifically, look for and install maintenance releases (MRs) and firmware updates when they become available. You’ll be notified of new MRs and firmware updates through Isilon product updates that you subscribed to in step one. You can also check the Current Isilon Software Releases document for a list of latest and recommended updates.

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, send an email to isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, send an email to isicontent@emc.com.

 

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Decode our new EMC Isilon nodes: S210 and X410

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

[Editor’s note: Two corrections about the number of serial ports and the front panel light were made to the original Decode the Node videos published on 7/31, and both videos were republished on 8/18 and 8/19. This article was updated to include links to the latest videos.]

Earlier this month, we announced the availability of two next generation EMC® Isilon® nodes: the S210 node for ultra-fast primary storage and high IOPS applications, and the X410 node to handle high-concurrent and sequential-throughput applications.

To become better acquainted with these Isilon nodes, we have new videos where we decode the Isilon S210 node and the Isilon X410 node. Each video provides the node’s basic specifications, and shows you what all of the node’s components look like, inside and out, including:

  • Front of the node, with and without the front panel
  • Back of the node illustrating power supplies, power button, LEDs, and each connection port
  • Inside of the node

Wonder what’s inside the node?

We show you all the components located inside the node to satisfy your curiosity and increase your understanding about what makes the node run. We open the node for you, because the node must never be opened unless by an EMC certified Customer Support Engineer.

Sometimes node parts have to be replaced. For example, if EMC Isilon Technical Support determines that an external part has failed (such as a power supply, a hard drive, or the node’s front panel) and the node does not need to be opened, they will send a new part and you can replace the part yourself. If an internal node component fails (such as a PCIe card, DIMMs, or a fan) and the node needs to be opened, then only an EMC certified Customer Support Engineer may open the node to replace this type of component. You should never open the node and replace internal components yourself. Isilon Technical Support will schedule the replacement procedure for an internal part at your convenience.

For more information, watch the videos below.

Decode the Node: A Tour of the EMC Isilon S210

Decode the Node: A Tour of the EMC Isilon X410

To learn more about the S210 or X410 nodes, see the EMC Isilon S-Series spec sheet or the EMC Isilon X-Series spec sheet.

You can find the S210 node installation guide and X410 node installation guide on the ECN Isilon Community (login with an ECN Community account is required).  Or visit the EMC Online Support site for more X410 and S210 node documentation (login with EMC Online Support account is required).

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, send an email to isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, send an email to isicontent@emc.com.

 

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Pick your protocol: Multiprotocol file access in EMC Isilon OneFS

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

You’re rushing to meet a project deadline, and you need to update some related files that are stored on an EMC® Isilon® cluster. You’re working on a Linux computer, and you’re connected to the cluster over a Network File System (NFS) protocol. You need to access files in a directory that your coworker, who uses a Windows computer, created when they were connected to the same cluster over a Server Message Block (SMB) protocol. Thanks to the Isilon OneFS® operating system, you can seamlessly access your coworker’s files even though you are doing so through a very different protocol.

Multiple protocol support is a necessity in today’s IT organizations, which comprise a mix of Windows and UNIX/Linux operating environments. OneFS is designed to provide users with unified access to data on an Isilon cluster using a mix of common protocols, such as SMB, NFS, HTTP, and Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS). For a full list of supported protocols, see the OneFS administration guides or “EMC Isilon Multiprotocol Data Access with a Unified Security Model”.

So how does OneFS support a multiprotocol environment? What are the steps a system administrator needs to take to set up multiprotocol access in OneFS?

We have two videos that cover the basics and provide recommendations for setting up multiprotocol access in OneFS. The first video, “File Access Basics in an Isilon OneFS Multi-Protocol Environments,” provides a whiteboard overview of this topic. The second video, “Technical Demo: Multi-Protocol File Access Using EMC Isilon OneFS,” provide a demonstration of common multiprotocol commands and tasks.

File access basics and AIMA in OneFS

Supporting a mix of protocols requires supporting a mix of user identities and file permissions. This requirement can leave system administrators with several considerations when configuring OneFS.

Before discussing how OneFS handles multiprotocol file access, let’s first review how two operating environments, Windows and UNIX/Linux, authorize access to files. In a Windows environment, users are identified based on unique security identifiers (SIDs). Files or directories are secured through an Access Control List (ACL). In an UNIX environment, users and groups are identified through user identifiers (UIDs) and group identifiers (GIDs), respectively. Files are secured using POSIX mode bits.

OneFS uses Authentication, Identity Management, and Authorization (AIMA) to assign the right permissions and identifiers to users (and groups) no matter which protocols they use to connect to the cluster. To securely support NFS and SMB clients, OneFS does three things:

  • Connects to directory services, such as Microsoft Active Directory (AD) and Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP), which provides a security database of user and group accounts along with their information
  • Authenticates users and groups
  • Controls access to directories and files

When a user connects to an Isilon cluster, OneFS scans Active Directory and LDAP for the user’s identifiers. Once the user is authenticated, OneFS creates an access token for the user. OneFS then maps the user’s account (known as “user mapping” in OneFS) in one directory service to another. This single access token is the key to authorizing the user so they can access files that are stored and created on the cluster using different protocols.

For example, if a user, Mike, accesses a file share through SMB, OneFS will scan Active Directory and find an SID for him. If OneFS does not find any UIDs or GIDs associated with Mike via LDAP, OneFS will generate a UID and GID for him and save them to Mike’s access token, so he can access files created by NFS users.

The same type of mapping occurs for file permissions. If a file was created through SMB, it will be assigned an ACL to control who can access the file. OneFS will create equivalent POSIX mode bits for this file. File permissions can be saved to the Isilon cluster on disk in one of three modes: native, UNIX, or SID. For more information about each mode, and about AIMA and user mapping, read the “Identities, Access Tokens, and the Isilon OneFS User Mapping Service” white paper.

This is a brief summary of how multiprotocol file access works in OneFS. Watch the following video, “File Access Basics in an Isilon OneFS Multi-Protocol Environments,” for more information and recommendations for configuring multiprotocol access in OneFS. In this video, Principal Solutions Architect Amol Choukekar answers the following frequently asked questions:

  • What are multiprotocol basics?
  • How do Window and UNIX clients differ when they access files on OneFS?
  • How does OneFS handle user and group identities?
  • How does OneFS store file permissions in a multiprotocol environment?
  • How do clients access files that were created using a different protocol?
  • How does OneFS manage file permissions?
  • What if user names are not similar across authentication providers?

How to configure multiprotocol support in OneFS

You can manage user identity mapping and file permissions using the OneFS command-line interface and OneFS web administration interface. Watch the following video, “Technical Demo: Multi-Protocol File Access Using EMC Isilon OneFS” for demonstrations of the following tasks:

  • Review configured authentication providers
  • Review an access token for a user
  • Review existing identity mappings stored on the cluster
  • Delete existing identity mappings
  • Review ACL policies on the cluster
  • Create a user mapping rule for joining different user names

This video also offers the following demonstrations:

  • File access between Windows and UNIX
  • Creation of a synthetic ACL, which dynamically maps UNIX permissions to Windows rights
  • File permissions management

 

For more information about implementing multiprotocol in OneFS, contact your account representative. If you have feedback about this blog or these videos, send an email to isi-knowledge@emc.com. If you have a request for new documentation, send an email to isicontent@emc.com.