Archive for the ‘General’ Category

InsightIQ 3.2.1: Cool new stuff

Patrick Kreuch

Patrick Kreuch

Sr. Technical Writer at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Patrick Kreuch

Latest posts by Patrick Kreuch (see all)

[Editor’s note: We updated the title from InsightIQ 3.2 to InsightIQ 3.2.1, changed mentions of 3.2 to 3.2.1, and removed the original photo on 8/5/2015. InsightIQ 3.2 is replaced by InsightIQ 3.2.1. All the cool new features mentioned in this blog are available in InsightIQ 3.2.1, including a fix for an upgrade issue. For more information, refer to InsightIQ 3.2.1 release notes. And while we originally featured the “Deal with It” meme photo because it showcased the ultimate symbol of cool (wearing sunglasses indoors), we no longer considered it a good fit for this blog post. Call it a case of revenge of the meme. For questions or concerns about this blog post, please send an email to isi.knowledge@emc.com.]

Being cool isn’t just about expensive clothes and wearing sunglasses indoors. Being cool is about attitude, speed, and efficiency. Slow is never cool. InsightIQ 3.2.1 is easily the coolest release of InsightIQ yet. If you want to know why, keep reading.

New, faster, lighter PostgreSQL database

InsightIQ 3.2.1 has a sweet new PostgreSQL database instead of the old SQLite database. PostgreSQL offers the monitoring experience you’ve been waiting for. With the new PostgreSQL datastore, InsightIQ runs faster and requires less space to store the same amount of information. It’s the best of both worlds, and nothing is better than the best of both worlds, except maybe the best of three or four worlds. But really, how many worlds do you need?

Configurable stat collection

While earlier versions of InsightIQ were obsessed with collecting every single cluster statistic, InsightIQ 3.2.1 is a little more laid back. InsightIQ 3.2.1 enables you to specify which statistics you want to collect, so you have more room on your hard drive for videogames. If you just don’t care about CPU usage, InsightIQ is right there with you.

Datastore export

In previous versions of InsightIQ, if you wanted to transfer cluster data from one InsightIQ instance to another, you had to connect the two instances and keep them connected while the data was migrated. Those were the rules; that’s just the way things were. But InsightIQ 3.2.1 doesn’t play by the rules. It’s a lone wolf that stays up past midnight and drinks milk from the carton. InsightIQ 3.2.1 lets you export your datastore to a .tar file that you can later import to any number of other InsightIQ instances, and it lets you do it on your own time.

SmartPools support

InsightIQ 3.2.1 also enables you to break out performance data by node pools and tiers, which is more useful than cool, but does everything have to be cool? The answer is yes… and no. Because there are no definitive answers in life, only questions. And thinking like that makes you really cool.

Learn more

At this point, you probably can’t wait to start working with InsightIQ’s new database, move some datastores around, and apply a few node-pool breakouts. And the great thing is: you don’t have to! Follow the link below to start right now. The 1,000,000th user to click wins a free skateboard!*

https://community.emc.com/docs/DOC-42096

*I lied. There is no skateboard.

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New EMC Isilon support content for June 2015

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

Check out new EMC Isilon customer support content published in the month of June. Each month I’ll post a summary of newly published content for Isilon customers, as well as the top 10 most viewed knowledgebase articles.

New Isilon support content

Here are links to new customer support content that was published in June 2015. For example, you’ll find new a new ClusterTalk podcast episode (covering the 10,000 genome project and Hadoop content), a video demo about creating tiers in SmartPools, and OneFS technical blog posts.

CONTENT TYPE

TITLE AND LINK

ClusterTalk Podcast Episode 4
Isilon Community (ECN) Quick Reference Guide for Isilon Customers
Isilon Community (ECN) Blog Determining an Accurate File Count on OneFS Without InsightIQ
Isilon Community (ECN) Blog Isilon OneFS, Cluster Quorum, and Data Availability
Isilon Community (ECN) Blog SmartPools and Dynamic File Placement
Guide (requires login to EMC Online Support) Business Data Lake Protection Cloudera Edition 1.0 Integration Guide
Guide (requires login to EMC Online Support) Business Data Lake Protection 1.0 Integration Guide
Guide (requires login to EMC Online Support) Business Data Lake Protection Hortonworks Edition 1.0 Integration Guide
KB Article Isilon Info Hubs – Your source for Isilon content (204046)
KB Article ESA 2015-114 (204455)
KB Article ESA 2015-112 (204545)
Video Technical Demo: Data Tiering with EMC Isilon SmartPools

Most viewed knowledgebase (KB) articles

  1. Product Impacts of Upcoming Leap Second UTC adjustment on June 30th 2015 (197322)
  2. ESA-2014-146 (193304)
  3. ESA-2015-093 (202878)
  4. OneFS 7.1.1.2 SMB and Authentication Rollup Patches (196928)
  5. ETA 199379: UPDATE: Isilon OneFS: Microsoft security update MS15-027 may cause data to be unavailable to SMB clients that are authenticated to Isilon clusters through an Active Directory server that relies on the NTLM authentication protocol (199379)
  6. ETA 202452: Isilon OneFS: Nodes that have run for 497 consecutive days may restart without warning (199379)
  7. UPDATE: ETA 193819: EMC Isilon nodes: Mars-K+ drives may stop responding and be automatically smartfailed from Isilon nodes (193819)
  8. OneFS: How to reset the CELOG database and clear all historical events (16586)
  9. OneFS: Best practices for NFS client settings (90041)
  10. OneFS: How to safely shut down an Isilon cluster prior to a scheduled power outage (16529)

 

Tell us what you want to know! Contact us with questions or feedback about this blog at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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All about improving EMC Isilon OneFS release notes

Deb Kuykendall

Deb Kuykendall

Principal Technical Writer at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Deb Kuykendall

Latest posts by Deb Kuykendall (see all)

Back in February, I wrote about EMC Isilon OneFS release notes and hinted that we’d be making changes to the format to improve their usability. I’m happy to announce that these changes are now in place and that you can see them in the OneFS 7.1.1 release notes.

What’s Changed

We’ve merged all of the release notes pertaining to a release branch (for example, 7.1.1) into a single document. This means that the 7.1.1 release notes contain all of the information about this OneFS branch from OneFS 7.1.1.0 (released in August 2014) through 7.1.1.5 (released in June 2015).

The new document includes:

  • All the new features that were introduced in OneFS 7.1.1.0 through OneFS 7.1.1.5
  • All the issues that have been addressed in in OneFS 7.1.1.0 through OneFS 7.1.1.5
  • All the functionality changes that were introduced in in OneFS 7.1.1.0 through OneFS 7.1.1.5

What’s New

To improve the document’s usability, we defined a list of functional areas. And, to help ensure that the functional areas are well understood, we included the full list of functional areas and their definitions at the end of the release notes. For example, the functional area of SMB encompasses new features, changes, and issues that affect SMB environments.

The content in the release notes is organized first by release number (for example, OneFS  7.1.1.2)  and then by functional area. This means that if you want to know if there are any new features, resolved issues, or changes in functionality that affect a particular area, such as SMB, in a specific OneFS release, such as 7.1.1.5, you can use the bookmarks pane or the table of contents to easily find that information.

Here’s an example of what you’ll find in the new table of contents (TOC):

OneFS 7.1.1-7.1.1.5 release notes

And here’s an example of what you’ll find in the Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader bookmarks pane:

OneFS 7.1.1-7.1.1.5 Bookmarks

We’ve also added an introductory section for each chapter, describing what you can expect to find there.

The new document also highlights the Target Code release. This change helps you understand how the Target Code release relates to other releases in the branch.

What did we gain?

Before making these changes, if you wanted the full picture of a OneFS release or maintenance release, you’d have to download two or three documents and piece them together. Each document contained some unique information, such as new features, and some overlapping information, such as known issues. The differences weren’t always obvious.

Now all of the information is in a single document that clearly identifies the release in which a fix, a change, or a feature was introduced.

In addition, the release notes previously contained multiple, lengthy tables that were sorted by a cryptic ID number. If you wanted to find issues related to a specific area of operation, you’d have to do a keyword search and collect bits and pieces of information scattered throughout the document.

Now the information is categorized first by the release in which the feature, fix, or change was introduced, and then categorized into tables according to the functional area that the feature, fix, or change affects. The new tables are small and easily scanned, and the information they contain is tightly focused.

How we did it

Developing the new release note format was a team effort involving writers, an information architect, and members of our user experience team.

We conducted user testing and issued a survey about the new format to confirm that the changes we planned to implement were in fact improvements that would benefit our readers. The feedback we received from user testing influenced the development of the document.

For example, one of our concerns early on was that the document was too long. However, user testing indicated that our users don’t read the document from beginning to end. Their chief concern is finding specific pieces of information easily, and they tend to jump from one place to another using keywords, the table of contents, or the bookmarks pane. So document length is not an issue.

Also, we had initially planned to separate new features from changes in functionality. User testing showed that our readers expected to find all of the new and changed features and functionality in the same chapter.

The most striking piece of feedback? Categorizing the information by functional area scored as a significant improvement for all of our testers.

Here are some of the usability testers’ comments:

  • “This is so great! Seriously. This is so much more legible and issues are so much easier to find.
  • “For me the redesign is a massive improvement over the current format. I hope this new format can be the new standard.”
  • “Known issues clearly separated by topic is a huge gain in usability. A consolidated listing of known and resolved issues for the major + each MR in one location is a time saver. If I have to attempt several keyword searches to find what I need, it takes me only 50 percent the time to do this in a combined doc.”

What’s next

As of today, the new release note format has been implemented in the OneFS 7.1.1.0 – OneFS 7.1.1.5 release notes. By the end of July, the new format will be implemented in release notes for the OneFS 7.2.0 branch as new versions of OneFS are released, the new release note format will be used to document those releases.

A new project to evaluate whether the new format can be applied to the release notes for other EMC products will be underway soon.

We’d like to hear from you about the changes and how they affect your ability to use the OneFS 7.1.1 release notes.  You can provide feedback by taking the short survey located here:

http://bit.ly/isi-docfeedback

Or send an email to docfeedback@isilon.com.

These links are also available in the OneFS Release Resources section of the OneFS 7.1.1 Release Notes.

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Ask the Expert forum about EMC Isilon technical content on July 27

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

Do you have an opinion about the technical content that EMC Isilon publishes? The EMC Isilon Information Experience team—who generates documentation, release notes, videos, white papers, and more—wants to hear from you.

Let us know how we’re doing. RSVP for our Ask the Expert event on Isilon Product Community, starting July 27, 2015 and continuing through August 7. During this event, you can submit your questions, opinions, and ideas to a forum discussion thread. Answers will be submitted by the Isilon Information Experience team.

What is the “Ask the Expert” forum?

Ask the Expert (ATE) events are regularly scheduled forums that cover many topics and products. Previous ATE events include Scale-out Data Lakes and SMB Protocol Support.  In this special session, content professionals, including our Director of Information Experience, our blogger and social media lead, and several content developers will answer questions we receive from you.

You can ask us about anything related to our technical content, such as:

  • How can I be notified about the latest Isilon content?
  • How do you decide what content to publish?
  • How do I share my idea for a great paper/blog/article with you?
  • What is an Info Hub and why should I care?

What’s in it for you?

The EMC Isilon Information Experience team will post a summary of our ATE session findings. It will contain a roadmap for when you might expect to see the changes you request, if we can accommodate them, and an honest answer if we cannot.

For years, the global economy has been in transit from goods, to information, to knowledge. In particular, the need for trust grows as customers interact with content more often through more digital platforms and channels. Knowledge is now currency AND product. We recognize that our first contact with you may be through content, and we need to build trust through content.

The best way we can build trust with you is to exchange ideas, and the EMC Isilon Ask the Expert event on technical content is a great way to start the conversation. We hope to talk to you soon!

Visit the RSVP page for more details about this event. If you’re interested in more ATE forums, visit the Isilon Community or ECN event page for upcoming events.

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Check out the new EMC Isilon podcast

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

If you enjoy listening to technology-related podcasts while commuting on the bus or working out at the gym, there’s a new technology podcast about EMC Isilon that you can add to your listening queue.

The EMC Isilon ClusterTalk podcast was created by Chris Adiletta and Scott Pinzon of EMC Isilon, who also serve as its charismatic hosts. Each monthly hour-long episode features regular segments and expert guests. “Podcast discussions can be more frank and free-wheeling than in a more formal setting, so they provide a great way to address tech issues realistically,” says Scott.

From left to right, ClusterTalk hosts Chris Adiletta and Scott Pinzon

From left to right, ClusterTalk hosts and creators Chris Adiletta and Scott Pinzon

You can download the latest episode now from iTunes or listen on Stitcher.

Why a podcast?

There are several channels you can follow to get the technical information about EMC Isilon products. For example, you can download documentation from the EMC Online Support site (login required), follow @EMCIsilon on Twitter for news and updates, and ask product-related questions on our Isilon Community forum. Now you can listen to the ClusterTalk podcast to learn about tips for getting the most performance, efficiency, and insight from your EMC Isilon OneFS clusters.

“We wanted a way to connect with a large audience of customers over our passion for Isilon, the big data industry, and all of the ways that technology is pushing the boundaries of human capability,” says Chris.

Each episode features a cool command, a popular topic on the Isilon Community, and data storage-related news. You can also hear me each month on the “Hidden Gems” segment, where I reveal a new and intriguing bit of customer support content.

Scott, who also serves as the audio engineer, explains what he loves about the podcast format. “Audio is a fantastic medium for the mind. With sounds, we can help listeners imagine worlds that would require a Hollywood movie budget to create visually, or let them feel like we’re all hanging out discussing big data over beer. Podcasts are terrific for anyone who wants to always be learning!”

For more information, visit the podcast hub on the Isilon Community or show notes for the following episodes:

Feedback

We value your feedback on this podcast. Listeners can also ask questions for Chris and Scott to address on the podcast. You can submit your questions by sending an email to clustertalk@emc.com or leaving a community comment. You can also leave your feedback on this podcast by rating it on iTunes.

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Top 3 operational differences in EMC Isilon OneFS 7.1.1

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

As EMC Isilon OneFS 6.5 and OneFS 7.0 reach their end-of-service life (EOSL) this year, many EMC Isilon customers will be upgrading to OneFS 7.1.1. If you plan to upgrade to OneFS 7.1.1, there are several new features, enhancements, and operational changes that may affect your day-to-day administration tasks. We want you to be aware of some the differences that impact upgrade planning, because they may require pre-upgrade tasks. You can find detailed information in the OneFS 7.1.1 Behavioral and Operational Differences and New Features document on the Isilon Community and OneFS 7.1.1 release notes on the EMC Online Support site.

Meanwhile, here are the top three changes for you to prepare for:

  • Access zones: directory configuration and NFS access
  • SmartPools®: node pool configuration
  • Role-based access controls

Access zones

In OneFS 6.5, access to cluster resources was controlled by authentication providers such as SMB, NFS, and SSH. Beginning in OneFS 7.0, user access to the cluster is controlled through access zones. With access zones, you can partition the cluster configuration into self-contained units, and configure a subset of parameters as a virtual cluster with its own set of authentication providers, user mapping rules, and SMB shares. The built-in access zone is the System zone, which, by default provides the same behavior as OneFS 6.5. You can connect to access zones using all available authentication providers, NFS exports, and SMB shares.

In OneFS 7.1.1, however, you cannot configure NFS exports in multiple access zones. NFS access is restricted to the System zone only. (In OneFS 7.2, NFS is zone-aware for access to multiple access zones.)

Also, access zones require a unique top-level root directory in OneFS 7.1.1. The root directories, or base paths, for multiple access zones in OneFS 7.1.1 cannot overlap with each other.

An important note!

If you currently use multiple access zones in your OneFS 7.0 or OneFS 7.1 cluster, you must check your access zone configuration for overlapping directories. If base paths overlap before you upgrade to OneFS 7.1.1, all previously created access zones will be assigned a base path of /ifs. Refer to OneFS 7.1.1 and Later: Best Practices for Upgrading Clusters Configured with Access Zones before upgrading to prevent a scenario where directories are assigned a new base path to accommodate access zones in OneFS 7.1.1.

SmartPools

In OneFS 6.5, a group of nodes is called a disk pool. Different types of drives could be assigned to a disk pool. There are several changes in SmartPools since 7.0. Beginning in OneFS 7.0, a group of nodes is called a node pool, and a group of disks in a node pool is called a disk pool. Also beginning in OneFS 7.0, nodes are automatically assigned to node pools in the cluster based on the node type. This is called autoprovisioning. Node pools can only include drives of the same equivalence class (review the equivalence class of nodes in the Isilon Supportability & Compatibility Guide). However, you can include multiple node pools into a higher level grouping called tiers. Finally, in the web administration interface of OneFS 7.1.1, SmartPools is located as a tab within Storage Pools.

Disk pools can no longer be viewed or targeted directly through the OneFS 7.1.1 web administration interface or the command-line interface. Instead, the smallest unit of storage that can be administered in OneFS 7.0 is a node pool. Disk pools are managed exclusively by the system through autoprovisioning.

An important note!

If you are running OneFS 6.5 or OneFS 6.5.5 and have node pools of mixed node types, you must configure disk pools into supported OneFS 7.0 and later node pool configurations well in advance of upgrading to OneFS 7.1.1. Supported node pool configurations must contain nodes of the same type, according to their node equivalence class.

Role-based access control (RBAC)

In OneFS 6.5, you can grant web and SSH login and configuration access to non-root users by adding them to the administrator group. In OneFS 7.0 and later, the admin group is replaced with the administrator role using role-based access control (RBAC). RBAC enables you to create and configure additional roles. A role is a collection of OneFS privileges that are granted to members of that role as they log in to the cluster. Only root and admin user accounts can perform administrative tasks and add members to roles. OneFS comes pre-loaded with built-in roles for security, auditing, and system administration, and you can create custom roles with their own sets of privileges.

For information about role-based access, including a description of roles and privileges, see Isilon OneFS 7.0: Role-Based Access Control.

An important note!

For OneFS 6.5 and OneFS 6.5.5 users upgrading to OneFS 7.1.1, make sure you add existing administrators to an administrator role.

For more information about OneFS 7.1.1

Visit these links for more information about:

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, or comments about the video specifically, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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EMC Isilon sessions and labs at EMC World 2015

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

EMC World 2015 is just two weeks away! If you plan on attending this event in Las Vegas, Nevada on May 4-7, you’ll have several opportunities for getting in-depth Isilon information through virtual labs and technology sessions.

Virtual labs

The virtual lab (vLab) experience at EMC World offers two types of labs: self-paced and instructor-led. Anyone can sign up for the self-paced labs, which are available Monday through Thursday, on a first-come, first-served basis. To attend an instructor-led lab, register onsite by visiting the EMC vLab registration desk in The Village at EMC World.

There will be three labs featuring Isilon products.

  • Deploying Hadoop on Isilon (instructor-led; register onsite)
    Deploying Hadoop on Isilon will provide you with hands-on experience with deploying and testing a Hadoop cluster using Isilon. This is a quick walkthrough of key parts of the Hadoop Starter Kit for Isilon.
  • Isilon Overview with InsightIQ (self-paced; first-come, first-served)
    Isilon Overview with InsightIQ will show you the simplicity of setup, scaleout storage, and the ease of management, availability, and even SmartLock mode (WORM) storage. Enhanced with an overview of InsightIQ, our powerful monitoring and reporting software that maximizes your time by minimizing storage management.
  • The Isilon Data Lake with Sparks and & HBase (self-paced; first-come, first-served)
    The Isilon Data Lake will demonstrate some of the key features of Isilon in a data lake environment, including multiprotocol access, access control lists, and access zones. You’ll see these features in action as you walk through a complete analytics use-case that integrates Apache Spark, Apache HBase, and simple Python scripts.

photo_vlabs_2

Technology Breakout Sessions

Breakout sessions occur throughout the conference. There are six technology breakout sessions dedicated to Isilon products, and several more that show how Isilon can be an integral part of emerging technology solutions. These sessions range in technical level of information from introductory to advanced. Visit the session catalog for scheduling options.

Find our booth

If you missed the technology session you wanted to attend or couldn’t get on the schedule for a vLab, stop by booth 813. You’ll find Isilon representatives at product kiosks who can walk you through short, 10-minute presentations and product demonstrations. We look forward to seeing you there!

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, or comments about the video specifically, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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Decode the EMC Isilon HD400 Node

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

If you’re looking to archive several petabytes of data, you might want to consider the new EMC Isilon HD400 node. It’s the biggest of the current Isilon nodes in terms of size—you can store up to 354 TB of data on 59 hard drives using a 4U rack space.

To learn more about the external and internal components of the HD400 node, watch the video, Decode the Node: EMC Isilon HD400.

HD400 and OneFS 7.2

The HD400 node was released with the Isilon OneFS operating system 7.2. The OneFS 7.2 release provides support for the following items required for the HD400:

  • New protection levels: New requested protection levels are available in OneFS 7.2 to account for the increased capacity of HD400 nodes. For example, the default protection level for node pools on the HD400 node is “3d:1n1d,” which means that data is protected in case 3 drives fail or if 1 node and 1 drive fail.
  • L3 cache: The HD400 node includes 800 GB of solid-state drive (SSD) storage, which is primarily used for L3 cache. This helps to reduce cache cycling times to improve system performance. For more information, see the L3 Cache Overview topic in the OneFS 7.2 Web Administration Guide or OneFS 7.2 CLI Administration Guide.
  • New drive layout: Disks in the HD400 are arranged in a grid orientation because the drives are inserted top-down into the node chassis. To view the new grid orientation in the OneFS 7.2 web administration interface, go to Dashboard > Cluster Status and click on the ID number. This will take you to the Node Status view, where you can scroll down to view the grid orientation.

    HD400 grid in the OneFS 7.2 web administration  interface.

    HD400 grid in the OneFS 7.2 web administration interface.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have questions about the HD400 node, join the Ask the Expert session on HD400 and OneFS 7.2 that continues through March 8, 2015 in the Isilon Community. Look through the discussion thread for useful information. Or post a question, and you’ll get answers from Isilon hardware and software experts, partners, and customers.

HD400 documentation

If you’re looking for an HD400 specification sheet, a hardware installation guide, or a HD400 field replacement unit (FRU) video, visit the HD400 Info Hub in the Isilon Community. This information hub is a curation destination for links to the latest and most relevant documentation for installing, maintaining, and servicing HD400 nodes.

The HD400 Info Hub on the Isilon Community

The HD400 Info Hub on the Isilon Community.

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, or comments about the video specifically, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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All about EMC Isilon OneFS release notes

Deb Kuykendall

Deb Kuykendall

Principal Technical Writer at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Deb Kuykendall

Latest posts by Deb Kuykendall (see all)

As you prepare to upgrade your EMC Isilon cluster to a new version of OneFS, you probably want to know the following information:

  • What new features are in the release
  • Which issues are fixed
  • Whether any issues involved with the new release could affect you

All this information can be found in the OneFS release notes. The release notes serve as the primary source for information about fixed issues, new features, enhancements, previously released patches, and known issues that affect the release.

How to find release notes

Currently, two sets of release notes are published for each supported OneFS branch. The initial release note is published when a new major or minor OneFS release is released (for example, 7.0, 7.1.1, and 7.2.0). Subsequently, new maintenance release (MR) notes are published whenever a new maintenance version for a particular branch is released (for example, 7.0.2.12, 7.1.1.2, and 7.2.0.1). The initial and maintenance release notes contain similar information, but there are a few differences.

All OneFS release notes are available in PDF format from the EMC Online Support site. The easiest way to find them is to go to support.emc.com and search for “OneFS <your 3-digit release number> release notes.” For example, if you’re running 7.0.2.12, search for “OneFS 7.0.2 release notes.”  You’ll find both the initial OneFS 7.0.2 Release Notes and the OneFS 7.0.2 MR Release Notes.

Searching for OneFS 7.0.2 release notes on the EMC Online Support site.

Searching for OneFS 7.0.2 release notes on the EMC Online Support site.

For more information about OneFS major, minor, and maintenance releases, see knowledgebase article 89210 on the EMC Online Support site.

What you’ll find in release notes

Release notes contain summary descriptions of issues that are fixed in the release, and known issues that affect the release. But it’s important to note that these lists aren’t all inclusive. We provide information about fixed and known issues that Isilon customers have reported or might encounter. Some fixes and known issues that affect OneFS code under-the-hood, and don’t have a known customer impact, aren’t included in the release notes.

The initial release notes contain information about functionality changes between the previous major/minor OneFS release and the current one—for example, changes in the formatting of CLI commands. They also contain summaries of new features. The MR release notes don’t contain feature and functionality information, but do contain information about previously released patches that are included in the release. In most cases, the initial release notes don’t contain any information about patches.

Structure and content

Initial and MR release notes contain a standard set of topics, as you’ll see in this screen shot from the 7.1.1.2 maintenance release notes.

7-1-1-2 toc_v2The Upgrading OneFS topic contains information about where you can find system requirements and applicable patches for the release, as well as the list of OneFS releases that can be upgraded to the documented release.

The release note also contains tables listing enhancements that were added in the release—for example, new command options—and issues that were resolved (that is, bug fixes). In maintenance release notes, the Enhancements and Resolved issues topics are cumulative and organized by maintenance release number.

The patches topic, which is relatively new to the release notes template, contains a table listing previously released patches that were included in the current maintenance release or a preceding maintenance release.

Improvements over time

Over the past few years, changes have been made to improve the ease of use and overall quality of the release notes. For example, because MR release notes are cumulative, they can become quite long. To fix this, we removed some information that can be accessed in other product documents, such as the upgrade instructions.

We also responded to requests to add patch and hardware compatibility information. For example, information about previously released patches can help you to confirm whether or not a later release includes the fixes from a patch that you’ve installed on your cluster.

Finally, we understand that cross-referencing two different types of release notes can be challenging, and that it might not always be clear which document contains the information you need. Looking ahead, we plan to combine the initial and MR release notes into a single document. This document will contain information about functionality changes and features that were introduced when the major or minor release was made available, but it will also be updated to include information about the most current MR that’s available for download from the EMC Online Support site.

Provide us with your release notes feedback

Do the release notes provide the information that you really need? Does the format help you find the information you’re looking for?  Please take a minute or two to help us improve the release notes so we can learn about ways to better serve your needs.

 

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, or comments about the video specifically, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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How EMC Isilon and Hadoop work together

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

Hadoop is a hot topic. The Hadoop open-source platform opens up exciting possibilities for mining big data, and many organizations are exploring how to incorporate Hadoop solutions into their day-to-day operations. EMC Isilon offers an enterprise Hadoop solution, and we have a comprehensive set of documentation describing how to implement Hadoop on an EMC Isilon cluster.

But implementing Hadoop distributions can be a complex process. The Isilon approach is different from traditional Hadoop deployments, and we often get general questions about how Isilon clusters actually work with Hadoop data analytic platform.

To help answer your questions, our team has created a new Isilon and Hadoop overview video that describes the basic architecture and functionality of how Isilon clusters and a Hadoop platform work together.

In this video, you’ll learn:

  • How Isilon separates storage resources from compute resources
  • How HDFS is supported as a native protocol in OneFS
  • How OneFS protects Hadoop data using enterprise data protection features
  • Which distributions Isilon supports, and how to find more information

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, or comments about the video specifically, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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