Archive for the ‘Beginner Topics’ Category

Check out the new EMC Isilon podcast

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

If you enjoy listening to technology-related podcasts while commuting on the bus or working out at the gym, there’s a new technology podcast about EMC Isilon that you can add to your listening queue.

The EMC Isilon ClusterTalk podcast was created by Chris Adiletta and Scott Pinzon of EMC Isilon, who also serve as its charismatic hosts. Each monthly hour-long episode features regular segments and expert guests. “Podcast discussions can be more frank and free-wheeling than in a more formal setting, so they provide a great way to address tech issues realistically,” says Scott.

From left to right, ClusterTalk hosts Chris Adiletta and Scott Pinzon

From left to right, ClusterTalk hosts and creators Chris Adiletta and Scott Pinzon

You can download the latest episode now from iTunes or listen on Stitcher.

Why a podcast?

There are several channels you can follow to get the technical information about EMC Isilon products. For example, you can download documentation from the EMC Online Support site (login required), follow @EMCIsilon on Twitter for news and updates, and ask product-related questions on our Isilon Community forum. Now you can listen to the ClusterTalk podcast to learn about tips for getting the most performance, efficiency, and insight from your EMC Isilon OneFS clusters.

“We wanted a way to connect with a large audience of customers over our passion for Isilon, the big data industry, and all of the ways that technology is pushing the boundaries of human capability,” says Chris.

Each episode features a cool command, a popular topic on the Isilon Community, and data storage-related news. You can also hear me each month on the “Hidden Gems” segment, where I reveal a new and intriguing bit of customer support content.

Scott, who also serves as the audio engineer, explains what he loves about the podcast format. “Audio is a fantastic medium for the mind. With sounds, we can help listeners imagine worlds that would require a Hollywood movie budget to create visually, or let them feel like we’re all hanging out discussing big data over beer. Podcasts are terrific for anyone who wants to always be learning!”

For more information, visit the podcast hub on the Isilon Community or show notes for the following episodes:

Feedback

We value your feedback on this podcast. Listeners can also ask questions for Chris and Scott to address on the podcast. You can submit your questions by sending an email to clustertalk@emc.com or leaving a community comment. You can also leave your feedback on this podcast by rating it on iTunes.

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Quick Start Lab Guide for adding capacity or performance in the EMC Isilon OneFS Simulator

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

The EMC Isilon OneFS Simulator is a great resource for trying out OneFS on a virtual infrastructure. The OneFS Simulator is a free version of OneFS 7.2 that you can download for non-production purposes. In this simulated OneFS environment, you can get an idea of what it’s like to administer a full Isilon cluster installation.

After downloading and setting up the OneFS Simulator, take a look at our recently published Quick Start Lab Guide. This lab guide walks you through exercises for using the OneFS Simulator. The featured exercise in this guide helps you add capacity, CPU, and memory to your virtual EMC Isilon cluster by adding another node.

Leave feedback about this lab guide

This is the first lab guide for the OneFS Simulator that we’ve published. Please let us know what you think. If you like this guide, have feedback about the format, or suggestions for other quick start guides, please leave a comment or send an email to isicontent@emc.com.

Get help with OneFS Simulator set up

If you need help with the initial set up of OneFS Simulator on your virtual environment, watch this video:

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, or comments about the video specifically, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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How EMC Isilon and Hadoop work together

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

Hadoop is a hot topic. The Hadoop open-source platform opens up exciting possibilities for mining big data, and many organizations are exploring how to incorporate Hadoop solutions into their day-to-day operations. EMC Isilon offers an enterprise Hadoop solution, and we have a comprehensive set of documentation describing how to implement Hadoop on an EMC Isilon cluster.

But implementing Hadoop distributions can be a complex process. The Isilon approach is different from traditional Hadoop deployments, and we often get general questions about how Isilon clusters actually work with Hadoop data analytic platform.

To help answer your questions, our team has created a new Isilon and Hadoop overview video that describes the basic architecture and functionality of how Isilon clusters and a Hadoop platform work together.

In this video, you’ll learn:

  • How Isilon separates storage resources from compute resources
  • How HDFS is supported as a native protocol in OneFS
  • How OneFS protects Hadoop data using enterprise data protection features
  • Which distributions Isilon supports, and how to find more information

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, or comments about the video specifically, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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Is your site ready for an EMC Isilon cluster?

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

If you’re in the market for a new data storage solution, such as an EMC® Isilon® scale-out network attached storage (NAS) system, you’ve probably done a good amount of research to determine which solution will best meet your needs.

One important area of research is determining if your data center is ready for an EMC Isilon cluster. The Isilon Site Preparation and Planning Guide (login with an EMC Community Network account required) can help answer important questions about how to prepare a data center infrastructure for new Isilon equipment. Designed for system administrators or facility managers, this guide offers specific information about environmental and power requirements for data centers.

The information in this guide extends beyond providing site requirements. It’s also a useful reference for selecting equipment and preparing for the arrival and set up of your new cluster.

Selecting the right equipment

EMC Isilon NodesThe Isilon Site Preparation and Planning Guide is a singular resource for specifications and recommendations about all the equipment that makes up an Isilon cluster.

For example, this guide includes specifications for the following:

  • Nodes: Get specs on storage capacity, dimensions, and more for all supported nodes including S210, S200, X200, X410, X400, NL400, and A100 accelerator nodes.
  • Rack cabinets: Learn about standard storage racks requirements and delivery dimensions.
  • Cables: Get recommendations for managing InfiniBand and Cat 5 cables. For demonstrations of proper cable management, watch the EMC Isilon Site Preparation and Planning: Cabling video.

Installing your cluster

For an overview of cluster installation basics, such as topology, node positioning, and planning for expansion or service needs, watch the EMC Isilon Site Preparation and Planning: Cluster Installation video.

To help you with the installation process, Isilon Professional Services can assist you with setting up your new Isilon cluster to meet the needs of your specific workflows. The Isilon Site Preparation and Planning Guide provides a list of what to consider when first installing your cluster, which you can review with your Professional Services account representative:

  • Which version of the Isilon OneFS® operating system to install on the cluster
  • Network connectivity details, including IP ranges, for your cluster nodes, client, and InfiniBand networks
  • DNS configuration details, including name servers and search lists
  • Directory services such as Active Directory, LDAP, NIS, or local user groups
  • File sharing protocols such as SMB and NFS, and advanced file sharing options
  • Data protection levels, anti-virus solutions, NDMP backup, and auditing
  • Cluster alert solutions such as ESRS and SNMP monitoring

For more complete information on these topics, read the Isilon Site Preparation and Planning Guide.

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, send an email to isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, send an email to isicontent@emc.com.

 

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Role-based access control in EMC Isilon OneFS 7.1: An overview

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

In EMC® Isilon® OneFS® 7.0 and 7.1, you can use role-based access control (RBAC) for administration tasks in place of a root or administrator account. A role is a collection of OneFS privileges that are limited to an area of administration. For example, you can create custom roles for security, auditing, storage, or backup tasks. Privileges are assigned to roles. As a user logs in to the cluster through the Platform API, the OneFS command-line interface, or the OneFS web administration interface, they’re granted privileges based on their role membership.

For information on how to create and manage roles through the OneFS command-line interface, see the OneFS 7.1 CLI Administration Guide – page 252 (requires login to the EMC Online Support site).

For an overview about RBAC in OneFS 7.1, watch the following video, “Enterprise Features in OneFS 7.1: Role Based Access Control.”

If you have questions or feedback, send an email to isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, send an email to isicontent@emc.com.

Video Transcript

Hello, I’m Andrey Tychkin with EMC Isilon.

In this video, we’ll talk about Role Based Access Control or RBAC, a feature of OneFS 7.1.

Role Based Access Control allows us to delegate specific administration tasks to users of the OneFS cluster.

Let’s take an example.

Let’s say I’m a NAS administrator and I want my Windows team to manage SMB administration on the cluster separate from, say, my UNIX team.

I’ll start by creating a role and giving it a meaningful name, such as SMB-ADMIN.

Once the role is created, I can add some privileges to it.

Privileges are sets of allowable actions.

They can be read-only for monitoring, or they can be read-write for actual configuration changes.

For SMB administration, I’ll need an SMB setting privilege and a WEB UI log in privilege.

We can also choose from one of the four predefined roles in OneFS which already have privileges assigned to them.

They are SecurityAdmin for RBAC administration, SystemAdmin for general system administration tasks, VMwareAdmin for managing backups of virtual machines, and AuditAdmin for Auditing.

Once we have our roles and privileges set up, all we need to do is add some members to it.

Members can be any users from authentication providers such as AD, LDAP, or NIS.

In our case, it’s our friend Mike from AD who, once he’s added to this role, he’s able to administer SMB on this cluster.

Role based access control is managed from the CLI by using the isi auth roles command.

Detailed information on RBAC is available in the OneFS Administration Guide.

If you have questions or want to implement OneFS 7.1 features in your environment, please contact your account team.

Thank you for watching.

EMC Isilon SnapshotIQ: An overview and best practices

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

If you want to capture a moment in time with a camera, you snap a picture. When you want to capture the data on your cluster at a moment in time with the EMC® Isilon® OneFS® operating system, you take a snapshot.

EMC Isilon SnapshotIQ™ is a licensed software module that lets you create new snapshots and manage snapshot schedules. In this blog post, you’ll learn about SnapshotIQ basics and best practices.

SnapshotIQ overview

A snapshot is taken at a directory-level. The snapshot maintains an image of data that existed in that directory at that moment when the snapshot was created, even if the data changes. Taking a snapshot is an instantaneous operation. Rather than create a redundant copy of the data blocks, snapshots use pointers to reference current blocks on the cluster. Because of this, snapshots do not consume additional disk space unless the data referenced by the snapshot is modified. If the files are modified, the snapshot stores read-only copies of the original blocks.

Image provided by Patrick Kreuch

Image provided by Patrick Kreuch

Snapshots are the foundation for data protection strategies in OneFS. Snapshots are also used by the EMC Isilon SyncIQ™ software module to replicate a consistent point-in-time image of a directory from one cluster to another.

Watch the following video, “Data Protection and Disaster Recovery with Isilon SnapshotIQ,” to learn how to manage snapshots with the SnapshotIQ module. EMC Isilon Senior Solutions Architect, Chris Klosterman, answers the following frequently asked questions:

  • What is a snapshot and why do I need it?
  • How does SnapshotIQ work?
  • Where does OneFS store snapshots?
  • What are some example schedules?
  • How is data restored?
  • When do OneFS snapshots expire and how is the snapshot space reclaimed?
  • Can I modify data in a snapshot?

SnapshotIQ best practices

You may find that working with a large number of snapshots can become challenging to manage. Consider the following best practices to improve snapshot management and avoid cluster performance degradation.

  • Do not create more than 1,000 snapshots of a single directory.
  • Consider the depth of the directory path when creating snapshots. If the path is too high on the directory tree, it will cost more cluster resources to modify data referenced by the snapshot. If the path is too deep, you may need to create more snapshot schedules, which can be difficult to manage.
  • Create an alias name for your snapshot schedules in the OneFS web administration interface. Use the alias name to help you look up the most recent snapshot generated from a schedule.
  • Do not disable the snapshot delete job in the OneFS Job Engine.

For additional best practices and details about SnapshotIQ, see the “Snapshots” section in the OneFS Administration Guide.

If you have questions or feedback about this blog or these videos, email isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, email isicontent@emc.com.