Archive for April, 2015

Top 3 operational differences in EMC Isilon OneFS 7.1.1

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

As EMC Isilon OneFS 6.5 and OneFS 7.0 reach their end-of-service life (EOSL) this year, many EMC Isilon customers will be upgrading to OneFS 7.1.1. If you plan to upgrade to OneFS 7.1.1, there are several new features, enhancements, and operational changes that may affect your day-to-day administration tasks. We want you to be aware of some the differences that impact upgrade planning, because they may require pre-upgrade tasks. You can find detailed information in the OneFS 7.1.1 Behavioral and Operational Differences and New Features document on the Isilon Community and OneFS 7.1.1 release notes on the EMC Online Support site.

Meanwhile, here are the top three changes for you to prepare for:

  • Access zones: directory configuration and NFS access
  • SmartPools®: node pool configuration
  • Role-based access controls

Access zones

In OneFS 6.5, access to cluster resources was controlled by authentication providers such as SMB, NFS, and SSH. Beginning in OneFS 7.0, user access to the cluster is controlled through access zones. With access zones, you can partition the cluster configuration into self-contained units, and configure a subset of parameters as a virtual cluster with its own set of authentication providers, user mapping rules, and SMB shares. The built-in access zone is the System zone, which, by default provides the same behavior as OneFS 6.5. You can connect to access zones using all available authentication providers, NFS exports, and SMB shares.

In OneFS 7.1.1, however, you cannot configure NFS exports in multiple access zones. NFS access is restricted to the System zone only. (In OneFS 7.2, NFS is zone-aware for access to multiple access zones.)

Also, access zones require a unique top-level root directory in OneFS 7.1.1. The root directories, or base paths, for multiple access zones in OneFS 7.1.1 cannot overlap with each other.

An important note!

If you currently use multiple access zones in your OneFS 7.0 or OneFS 7.1 cluster, you must check your access zone configuration for overlapping directories. If base paths overlap before you upgrade to OneFS 7.1.1, all previously created access zones will be assigned a base path of /ifs. Refer to OneFS 7.1.1 and Later: Best Practices for Upgrading Clusters Configured with Access Zones before upgrading to prevent a scenario where directories are assigned a new base path to accommodate access zones in OneFS 7.1.1.

SmartPools

In OneFS 6.5, a group of nodes is called a disk pool. Different types of drives could be assigned to a disk pool. There are several changes in SmartPools since 7.0. Beginning in OneFS 7.0, a group of nodes is called a node pool, and a group of disks in a node pool is called a disk pool. Also beginning in OneFS 7.0, nodes are automatically assigned to node pools in the cluster based on the node type. This is called autoprovisioning. Node pools can only include drives of the same equivalence class (review the equivalence class of nodes in the Isilon Supportability & Compatibility Guide). However, you can include multiple node pools into a higher level grouping called tiers. Finally, in the web administration interface of OneFS 7.1.1, SmartPools is located as a tab within Storage Pools.

Disk pools can no longer be viewed or targeted directly through the OneFS 7.1.1 web administration interface or the command-line interface. Instead, the smallest unit of storage that can be administered in OneFS 7.0 is a node pool. Disk pools are managed exclusively by the system through autoprovisioning.

An important note!

If you are running OneFS 6.5 or OneFS 6.5.5 and have node pools of mixed node types, you must configure disk pools into supported OneFS 7.0 and later node pool configurations well in advance of upgrading to OneFS 7.1.1. Supported node pool configurations must contain nodes of the same type, according to their node equivalence class.

Role-based access control (RBAC)

In OneFS 6.5, you can grant web and SSH login and configuration access to non-root users by adding them to the administrator group. In OneFS 7.0 and later, the admin group is replaced with the administrator role using role-based access control (RBAC). RBAC enables you to create and configure additional roles. A role is a collection of OneFS privileges that are granted to members of that role as they log in to the cluster. Only root and admin user accounts can perform administrative tasks and add members to roles. OneFS comes pre-loaded with built-in roles for security, auditing, and system administration, and you can create custom roles with their own sets of privileges.

For information about role-based access, including a description of roles and privileges, see Isilon OneFS 7.0: Role-Based Access Control.

An important note!

For OneFS 6.5 and OneFS 6.5.5 users upgrading to OneFS 7.1.1, make sure you add existing administrators to an administrator role.

For more information about OneFS 7.1.1

Visit these links for more information about:

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, or comments about the video specifically, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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EMC Isilon sessions and labs at EMC World 2015

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

EMC World 2015 is just two weeks away! If you plan on attending this event in Las Vegas, Nevada on May 4-7, you’ll have several opportunities for getting in-depth Isilon information through virtual labs and technology sessions.

Virtual labs

The virtual lab (vLab) experience at EMC World offers two types of labs: self-paced and instructor-led. Anyone can sign up for the self-paced labs, which are available Monday through Thursday, on a first-come, first-served basis. To attend an instructor-led lab, register onsite by visiting the EMC vLab registration desk in The Village at EMC World.

There will be three labs featuring Isilon products.

  • Deploying Hadoop on Isilon (instructor-led; register onsite)
    Deploying Hadoop on Isilon will provide you with hands-on experience with deploying and testing a Hadoop cluster using Isilon. This is a quick walkthrough of key parts of the Hadoop Starter Kit for Isilon.
  • Isilon Overview with InsightIQ (self-paced; first-come, first-served)
    Isilon Overview with InsightIQ will show you the simplicity of setup, scaleout storage, and the ease of management, availability, and even SmartLock mode (WORM) storage. Enhanced with an overview of InsightIQ, our powerful monitoring and reporting software that maximizes your time by minimizing storage management.
  • The Isilon Data Lake with Sparks and & HBase (self-paced; first-come, first-served)
    The Isilon Data Lake will demonstrate some of the key features of Isilon in a data lake environment, including multiprotocol access, access control lists, and access zones. You’ll see these features in action as you walk through a complete analytics use-case that integrates Apache Spark, Apache HBase, and simple Python scripts.

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Technology Breakout Sessions

Breakout sessions occur throughout the conference. There are six technology breakout sessions dedicated to Isilon products, and several more that show how Isilon can be an integral part of emerging technology solutions. These sessions range in technical level of information from introductory to advanced. Visit the session catalog for scheduling options.

Find our booth

If you missed the technology session you wanted to attend or couldn’t get on the schedule for a vLab, stop by booth 813. You’ll find Isilon representatives at product kiosks who can walk you through short, 10-minute presentations and product demonstrations. We look forward to seeing you there!

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, or comments about the video specifically, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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EMC Isilon InsightIQ 3.1.1 enhancements

Patrick Kreuch

Patrick Kreuch

Sr. Technical Writer at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Patrick Kreuch

Latest posts by Patrick Kreuch (see all)

No tool is so perfect that it cannot be improved. There’s no knife that couldn’t be sharper, no couch that couldn’t be comfier, no paperweight that couldn’t be heavier. EMC Isilon InsightIQ is a powerful tool, but it can always be made more powerful. That’s why we recently released InsightIQ  3.1.1: to make InsightIQ run faster and more reliably than ever before.

Enhancements

SPOILER ALERT: The following text describes some of the awesome new enhancements of InsightIQ 3.1.1. DO NOT READ if you just want to be pleasantly surprised when you download it.

Speed

Have you ever hiked up a mountain only to discover that your backpack was full of rocks? If so, you’re a really bad camper (or possibly just a geologist), but either way, you could have made that hike a lot faster without the rocks.

Image by akunamatata on Flickr

Image by akunamatata on Flickr

You may notice while running the new version of InsightIQ that it’s a lot faster than before. We’ve removed the rocks by tweaking InsightIQ to run more efficiently, including making improvements to debugging behavior. We’ve removed a lot of unnecessary debugging effort, which frees InsightIQ resources to work on more important things.

We’ve also improved InisghtIQ’s datastore technology. In previous versions, InsightIQ would let disk-space usage data take up more than its fair share of space in the InsightIQ datastore. InsightIQ 3.1.1 makes sure that free space is divided up equally for all.

Stability

InsightIQ 3.1.1 includes improvements to monitoring stability, especially for large clusters. Earlier instances of InsightIQ would request a lot of data from large clusters all at once, which could cause the clusters to become confused and passive aggressive. InsightIQ 3.1.1 has learned to be more patient and build a healthier relationship between it and the monitored clusters.

We’ve also improved stability by correcting an error in InsightIQ’s timeout behavior. Have you ever noticed InsightIQ’s connection timing out more than usual? This was likely due to InsightIQ interpreting a timeout value of 0 as actually meaning 0 (instead of infinity). We’ve reconfigured InsightIQ to fix this issue and stop taking things so literally.

Finally, we’ve made some adjustments to reduce “data retrieval delayed” errors. When previous versions of InsightIQ would lose a connection to the cluster, InsightIQ would sometimes report a data retrieval delayed error indefinitely, rather than report that the connection had been severed. This led to some difficulty diagnosing the issue.

Learn more

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, or comments about the video specifically, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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Quick Start Lab Guide for adding capacity or performance in the EMC Isilon OneFS Simulator

Kirsten Gantenbein

Kirsten Gantenbein

Principal Content Strategist at EMC Isilon Storage Division
Kirsten Gantenbein
Kirsten Gantenbein

The EMC Isilon OneFS Simulator is a great resource for trying out OneFS on a virtual infrastructure. The OneFS Simulator is a free version of OneFS 7.2 that you can download for non-production purposes. In this simulated OneFS environment, you can get an idea of what it’s like to administer a full Isilon cluster installation.

After downloading and setting up the OneFS Simulator, take a look at our recently published Quick Start Lab Guide. This lab guide walks you through exercises for using the OneFS Simulator. The featured exercise in this guide helps you add capacity, CPU, and memory to your virtual EMC Isilon cluster by adding another node.

Leave feedback about this lab guide

This is the first lab guide for the OneFS Simulator that we’ve published. Please let us know what you think. If you like this guide, have feedback about the format, or suggestions for other quick start guides, please leave a comment or send an email to isicontent@emc.com.

Get help with OneFS Simulator set up

If you need help with the initial set up of OneFS Simulator on your virtual environment, watch this video:

Start a conversation about Isilon content

Have a question or feedback about Isilon content? Visit the online EMC Isilon Community to start a discussion. If you have questions or feedback about this blog, or comments about the video specifically, contact us at isi.knowledge@emc.com. To provide documentation feedback or request new content, contact isicontent@emc.com.

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